Archive for the ‘Bulgaria’ Category

Bulgarian parliament passed amendments to human medicine act

Friday, September 7th, 2012

Sofia 4 September 2012.

Bulgarian parliament passed Tuesday the amendments to the Medical Products in Human Medicine Act.

The draft bill for amendments and supplements to the act, filed by the Council of Ministers, was adopted with 91 votes “for”, 2 votes “against” and 18 abstentions.

The amendments proposed by MP Vanyo Sharkov with the Blue coalition and a group of MPs, were turned down.

Before the draft bill was voted on, Bulgarian Minister of Health, Desislava Atanasova said that the government’s motives for amendments to the draft bill concern the medical safety rules.

“These amendments require serious change, which concern the fake medical products. I hope that the amendments will be backed by all parliamentary groups, because they involve the safety of all Bulgarian patients. “

In her words, the establishment of a national council on prices and reimbursement aims at establishing a central body, which should monitor, register and update the prices of the medical products and compare them to those in the rest of the EU countries.

“Only in a week we have drastic decrease of 5% to 75% of 74 new medical products,” stated the minister.

 

Source of the article

Healthcare – One of the priorities for the Bulgarian government in 2012

Monday, March 5th, 2012

 

 

Despite the economic crisis, Bulgaria’s healthcare system will undergo a reform destined to allocate the limited existing funds in such a manner that will benefit doctors and patients alike.

 

In 2012, healthcare is expected to be among the priorities of the Bulgarian government, along with the construction of highways. Despite the economic crisis, the government has allocated more money from the state budget for the healthcare sector this year thus continuing the reform in the healthcare sector. This became clear at the final briefing of Prime Minister Boyko Borissov on New Year’s Eve on healthcare-related topics.

In early December 2011, PM Borissov made it one of the cabinet’s goals to solve the issue with the debts of hospitals, including measures such as penalties and replacement of current hospital directors. Furthermore, Bulgaria’s Health Minister Stefan Konstantinov promised not only personnel changes but also the unification of entire hospital wards in response to the expectations of Bulgarians for urgent reforms in that area.

The coming reforms are to reduce the number of hospitals in Bulgaria so that medics could work at one place but receive higher wages, while the budget for healthcare should be issued more effectively so that it benefits the patients.  According to him, this does not constitute an administrative closing down of some hospitals but an effort for restructuring of hospitals that have insufficient staff and no patients.

“Instead of going bankrupt in a natural way, they should rather take the opportunity to restructure with help from EU funding”, he said. The Prime Minister also firmly supports this idea.

“Actually, the people who have hospitals with poor quality of treatment in their own towns are doomed by going there”, the Premier pointed out. “Let the experts say that there are hospitals where neither the equipment nor the staff is at the appropriate level. For the patients it is therefore better to be taken by the ambulance at a larger hospital rather than be treated badly in the local hospital. This is the case today.”

According to the Healthcare Minister Konstantinov, the bill brought in parliament at the end of 2011 only comes to confirm that healthcare remains a key priority for the government and the reform will continue.

Part of the reform is the introduction of an electronic health card that has been discussed for more than 10 years now. Work is under way now on the creation of an electronic prescription and electronic patient file. The system is expected to be ready in 2013 but only this year the government has started using EU funds for this large scale project. Bulgaria is one of few EU countries where healthcare has not been a governmental priority for many years of governments. But the electronic health card is part of the overall e-government system, stated Stefan Konstantinov.

“Currently, the team of Deputy Minister Valery Borissov, who is responsible for e-government, is developing an electronic identifier”, Minister Konstantinov said. “With this card, citizens will be able to use administrative services and review their health record. The great difficulty is how to design the overall system. The card is only an element and is an easy thing to do. Bank e-cards virtually cost less than 1 Lev and one can also use them for administrative services. So far, the system of expensive drugs spent some 2.4 million Leva but it is not yet operating and the money has been paid. Spending was done differently in the past. Now we have very little money, so we need to figure out the best approach to allocating and spending the budget. We can easily make a card for health services, then another one for administrative services, and then the digital signature. But this is not the right approach.”

“It would have been a very good solution if we had included the electronic chip for healthcare services in the new ID card that were issued some time ago, PM Boyko Borissov said with regret. In this way, citizens could have their ID card issued once and the use it for all services. However, we missed this opportunity. So now we have to seek another opportunity with another type of card. A much better option which was how things are done in Estonia has already been missed during the term of the previous government when it launched the competition for replacement of identity documents”, Bulgaria’s Prime Minister Boyko Borissov commented.

 

Source of the article here:

http://bnr.bg/sites/en/Lifestyle/Politics/Pages/0401HealthcarePrioritiesin2012.aspx

Bulgarian Doctors Go Abroad for Better Pay

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

 

More than 500 Bulgarian doctors have left the country to work abroad in 2010, says the Bulgarian Doctors Union.

The secretary general of the Union, Dimitar Lenkov, announced the data, which was established on the basis of certificates issued for good medical practice, required for working abroad.

Mostly anesthesiologists and surgeons left the Balkan country in 2010, followed by urologists, orthopedists, traumatologists, obstetricians-gynecologists and pediatricians.

According to Lenkov, the number of doctors who left Bulgaria in 2009 was 400, while the number in 2008 was 380. He noted that most of the doctors head to Germany, France, England, North Ireland, Denmark and Sweden.

Data from the Society of Anesthesiologists in Bulgaria showed that over the past several years, the number of specialists in the country has dropped from 1,500 to 600. The monthly salary of an anesthesiologist in Bulgaria is about BNG 700-800 (about 350-400 Euros), while in France it is about 6,000 Euros.

He explained that in some regions of Bulgaria, mostly mountainous areas that are difficult to reach, including in northwestern Bulgaria and the Rhodope Mountains, even lack general practitioners.

The data form the Bulgarian Doctors Union showed that the number of nurses in the country is also below the minimum. Right now there are about 30.000 nurses practicing in Bulgaria.

“According to the world standards of quality of medical service, one doctor should work with two nurses. In Bulgaria, one doctor works with one nurse and some doctors even work without nurses,” said Lenkov.

The year 2011 suggests that the number of doctors leaving the country would double. Meaning that, Bulgaria could lose over 1000 doctors by the end of this year. Most of the doctors leaving the country are young doctors. 80% of them just graduated. After they find positions in foreign hospitals, they establish themselves as doctors there and are most likely never to come back.

 

http://www.balkaninsight.com/en/article/bulgarian-doctors-go-abroad-for-better-pay-union-says

THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN FRANCE AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA AND LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Given the fact that you considered our previous comparison study: “The cost of living comparison between Germany and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Lithuania” useful, here, we present you the sequel.

Continuing on the same idea, you are a specialist doctor (because France only recruits specialists), you like the French lifestyle, culture, language and everything France has to offer and consider continuing your medical career in France!

So we, the EGV Recruiting Team, present to you the cost of living comparison between France and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Lithuania:

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 12.04€ in France

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 46.59€ in France

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 1.04€ in France

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is about 1.23€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 8.69€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.57€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.25€
Transportation:
A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 47.47€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.81€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 1.43€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 95.45€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.36€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 29.72€

 

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in France the monthly fee is 57.56€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in France the fee is 17.15€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 9.21€

 

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost about 79.57€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 32.14€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost 98.46€

 

Rent per month:
The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 486.60€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 938.51€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

 

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in France 1938.11€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in France it is 4.10%
In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in France, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in France 165.46% higher than in Romania, 148.36% higher than in Hungary, 176.79% higher than in Bulgaria, 83.28% higher than in Slovakia and 171.38% higher than in Lithuania.

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THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN GERMANY AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA, LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

So let’s say you are a doctor living in Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia or Lithuania. By now I guess you know all about the shortcomings of the healthcare system in your country, about the general smaller wages than in Germany and about the other things that make you consider a career abroad.

You have your medical diploma, you might already speak the German language at a B2 level, and if you are determined enough you might want to start or continue your medical career as a resident or specialist doctor in Germany.
Considering the fact that we live in the XXI century, I bet that you start to gather information from the internet such as job offers, wages, recruitment agencies, information regarding different areas of Germany, school costs for your children, rent costs, etc.
Most recruitment agencies inform you about a lot of benefits, but here at EGV Recruiting, we like to go the extra mile and share a perspective about the living costs in your country in comparison to living costs in Germany.

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 8.25€ in Germany

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 38.3€ in Germany

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 0.73€ in Germany

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is about 1.72€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 6.98€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 2.28€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 0.92€

Transportation:

A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 54.70€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.49€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.48€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 128.62€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 0.14€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 22.53€

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the monthly fee is 44.27€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the fee is 15.76€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 8.41€

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost about 83.54€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 34.62€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost 91.14€

Rent per month:

The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 376.07€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 773.25€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany 2,104.90€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in Germany it is 4.11%

In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in Germany, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in Germany 240.49% higher than in Romania, 214.14% higher than in Hungary, 245.06% higher than in Bulgaria, 133.69% higher than in Slovakia and 250.03% higher than in Lithuania. 

 

 

The patients form Giurgiu, Romania, can’t be treated in Ruse, Bulgaria, because connections between the two healthcare systems don’t exist.

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

“In theory, the hospital form Ruse could handle the treatment of Romanian patients from Giurgiu. The problem is that the two healthcare systems can’t collaborate” said Dr. Kiril Panayotov. According to him there are no technical obstacles regarding patient transport over the border:

The main problem regarding patient care across the borders and involving healthcare systems from different countries members of the European Union appears for the first time in the areas with the most patient transfers – areas such as Belgium, Holland, Luxembourg and Germany. These are the first countries to insist for measures regarding coverage of the healthcare systems. This problem was first raised in the European Parliament in 2009, but the Council was against such a measure, and the problem will be brought in front of the European Parliament once again at the beginning of 2012.

Source of the article here:  http://bnr.bg/sites/horizont/News/Bulgaria/Pages/1107_Ruse.aspx

FRUSTRATED EASTERN EUROPEAN DOCTORS HEAD WEST

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

More and more eastern European doctors are heading west as government economic austerity measures eat into their pay and conditions deteriorate, leaving behind understaffed health systems in crisis.

From Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania, growing numbers of physicians, surgeons, anesthetists and other specialists are packing up for countries like Britain, Germany and Sweden.

“There are no prospects for me in Hungary,” said surgeon Csaba Andok, who is in his 50’. “I am leaving for Germany where my work is appreciated.” Last year 1,111 physicians applied to the Hungarian government for a certificate allowing them to work abroad.

This may represent just a fraction of the country’s 30.000 practicing doctors but, in a worrying trend for the future, it involves many of the 800 new graduates every year.

“Discontent is widespread among doctors, primarily due to deteriorating salary conditions”, Andok said. “Our caseloads have increased over the past year, but we still get the same pay, 550-740Euros per month, a salary comparable to that of a waiter in a trendy café. Work is carried out by a very limited staff and the shortage of personnel makes daily pressure unbearable,” Andok said.

The economic crisis that hit Hungary in 2008 led the government to impose stiff austerity measures, including a sales tax hike, the scraping of 13th month annual bonuses and reduced heating subsidies.

The picture is not rosier in Romania where medical professionals have seen their salaries cut by at least 13 percent since the government introduced cost-cutting measures last July. The number of doctors wanting to leave the country almost doubled in 2010 to 2.779 from the previous year, according to the official figures.

In Bulgaria, nurses are leaving at the rate of 1.200 per year, estimates the association of medical professionals. They earn about 400-500 leva (205-255Euros) per month, several times less than the average pay of nurses in Britain.

The exodus is hammering the healthcare system in the EU’s poorest member states, in which the health ministry says has around half the 60.000 nurses the association of medical professional says it needs to function properly.

The Bulgarian emergency and anesthesia services are particularly hurt by the departure of hundreds of doctors a year, according to the union officials. Small hospitals meanwhile lack basic equipment and material, come even asking patients to bring along their own sheets.

In Estonia the complaints that push professionals to consider emigration are less about salaries than about standards and disheartening bureaucracy.

“The current health system in Estonia is a lot like it was during the Soviet era, with bureaucrats deciding how and for what funds are given,” said doctor Ivo Kolts, who also teaches anatomy at Tartu University.

“Estonian hospitals are often interested in making useless analyses and computer screenings because the state pays for such studies, regardless of whether a patient needs them or not. The quality of treatment is often not the priority.”

Desperate Hungarian doctors say they are considering resorting to drastic tactics such as their Czech colleagues: around 3000 of them handed out their resignations en masse in December. The action prompted the government to agree to several pay rises until 2013.

Hungary’s center-right government led by Prime Minister Viktor Orban says they are working to improve work conditions for the healthcare employees, but the details remain vague.

In the meantime retired doctors are being called back into service to fill vacant posts particularly in the countryside.

The governments in Bulgaria and Romania have not said how they plan to stop the mass exodus.

Poland has managed to stem a similar outflow of medical staff since 2005 by increasing salaries and investing in training, with some professionals now choosing to return.

 

Source of the article here: http://www.eubusiness.com/news-eu/eeurope-health.9da