Archive for the ‘Hungary’ Category

Doctors leaving Hungary: the official reports of 2012

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

In comparison to 2011, last year presented a total of 2061 (higher with 161 than in 2011) workers from the health care sector who applied for certificates from the Office of Health Authorization and Administrative Procedures to work abroad. It is true that according to the statistics of the Office of Health Authorization and Administrative Procedures, that in 2012 there were fewer doctors and more dentists, pharmacists and mostly health care professionals who have applied for the permits. The number of health care professionals who seek employment abroad has increased.

According to the data gathered by the Office of Health Authorization and Administrative Procedures, out of those who were seeking employment abroad, 1108 where doctors( 100 less than in 2011), in average almost as many as two years ago (1111), but compared with the data from 2006 (520) it is double.

 Compared with 2011 last year there were with three dozen more dentist who asked for certificate, a total of 255, and with 50% more pharmacists in total 65 who have applied at the authority.

The biggest increase was in the number of nurses: 518 have applied for certificates from the Office of Health Authorization and Administrative Procedures compared with the 314 of the previous year.

From the data of the Office of Health Authorization and Administrative Procedures the majority of doctors who have applied for the certificates in year 2012 had a specialist medical degree in total 738, the most doctors where: Internal medicine specialist (86), family doctors (75), anesthesiologist (74), surgeons (47), pediatricians (35), gynecologist (32), radiologists (25) and cardiologists (20). If we count the other health care professionals who handle children and the protection of the youth (+14 doctors) the number of pediatricians who have left the country has increased significantly.

The most popular country has become Germany which has taken over England which previously was without competition. From those who have applied for certificates the majority of doctors and nurses wants to work in Germany and Austria, only among the dentists and pharmacists does the UK still lead.

The division by age of the applicants shows that the majority of the applicants are young between 25-29 years. This is the same by the doctors; the majority of the applicant doctors are between this ages. An interesting fact is that doctors who are over 65 years have applied for the certificate. The majority of the dentists and pharmacists are as well between 25-29 years, only the average age of midwifes and nurses is higher 30-40.

In the year 2012 happened for the first time that the number of the woman who want to work abroad was higher than those of the men, from the total of 2061 applicants the number of woman was 1212. Only by the doctors is still higher the number of men, but the majority of applicants from dentists, pharmacists and nurses are women.

Comparatively the doctor emigration statistics from the previous years: In 2005 the number of doctors who have applied for certificates was 604, in 2006 this number was 520, in 2007 it was 590, in 2008 it was 728, in 2009 it was 887, in 2010 it was 1111 and in 2011 it was 1200.

 

Surce of the article: Orvosok Lapja 2013/3

20% of Hungarian physicians moved abroad

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

 

It is estimated that 4-5 thousand Hungarian physicians, nearly 20% of Hungary’s doctors moved abroad in recent years with hope for better living conditions. Most of them are young specialists in which the Hungarian state invested tens of millions (UHF) for training and formation. Despite the initial investment in training and formation, wage policies and working conditions can’t match the conditions offered by recruitment agencies, so the government has a hard time trying to keep the professionals home.

“Swedish language courses for several weeks in a Spanish resort town, pre-rented housing, job for the spouse, a nursery, kindergarten and school for children…”

The 32-year-old Peter passed his specialist exam 2 years ago. He started working at a hospital and at a private practice. Besides work he also started a family. After visiting a Swedish hospital Peter accepted the generous offer. His story is not an isolated case.

There are more and more medical and non-medical professionals that undertake positions in Western Europe. In terms of medical migration, the current involves all types of specialists, from nurses, residents and specialists. This dangerous trend can lead to serious disruptions in the domestic health care. In the past decades Hungarian doctors were severely underpaid and the government failed to remedy this serious threat.

In August, the government tried to slow the alarming rate of migration by implementing new wage policies.

EGV Recruiting

 

Source of article

Why Hungarian doctors choose to migrate abroad

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Only 2% of the ones that work abroad, plan to return to Hungary in the next 2 years.

“Since I started working here, during one year, I managed to get rid of my diabetes medication. I no longer have to hold diets, all the lab works are great, I’m well rested and balanced”- wrote a specialist doctor working in Germany in the query realized by the Resident Doctor Society, addressing the topic Hungarian doctors working abroad. Based on the answers given by the 150 questioned medics, the working abroad doctors’ general impression about the current situation in Hungary comes to the surface.

The query was realized online in October-December 2011. 85% of the responding doctors went abroad between 2008-2011. 71% of the participants worked in the Hungarian health care system before leaving abroad. From the answers given, 15% of abroad working Hungarian doctors, were considering even as students the possibility of leaving abroad.

When asked if they would ever plan on moving back to Hungary in the next 2 years, only 2% gave a positive answer. 58% said a definite no, and 25% would come back only if the system would change for the better. 15% were not sure or couldn’t give a precise answer. Even more so, the majority that gave a negative answer (28%) stated that they wouldn’t come back in the next 20 years.

7% of the respondents think about coming back in the next 5 years. 58% are still not sure about staying 5 years abroad. From the query one can draw the conclusion that there are 3 factors that prevent the doctors to come back:
1. The wages back home
2. The workload of over 60 hours/day
3. The impossibility of starting a family
4. Bribes

Based on the answers given, one can conclude that 2 out of 3 medics working abroad would come back if they would receive a decent salary starting from 300 000 Ft and normal amount of working hours.

For now it’s not hard to make a decision regarding staying abroad or coming home, because abroad, the colleagues’ patients and locals are very friendly, according to 90% of query respondents. Even more, residencies abroad are considered more efficient.

“Young doctors are ambitious and are integrated in the teams relatively quickly. Besides being under constant supervision, young doctors also get responsibilities from the start. Quality is assured via feedback. Proposals and ideas are also widely accepted. Most of these are promptly implemented.” –stated a resident doctor from Germany.

Another resident doctor working in Germany stated that despite his young age, he is allowed to perform operations. This is one of the rarest and most important things, besides this all positive and negative things are irrelevant. He also states that besides work, shifts and studying there is time for living.

The survey also addressed the issue of practices from abroad that could be easily implemented back home. The following answers were provided:

“Doctors are not caught up in administrative duties”.

“Regardless of someone’s profession or work, people respect each other”.

“After passing the specialist exam you actually can work by yourself”.

“Respecting the legislation regarding the work time and attributes”.

“What strikes me as an incredible difference is the fact that people listen to me despite being just a resident. Doctors and nurses work together in order to solve cases. On the other side there is a strong bond between doctors.”

Social studies were interested in learning about how Hungarians from across the border integrated themselves and live the day to day life:

“In order to avoid confusions I would like to add the fact that abroad you have to work a lot! Anyway in this particular field, it’s not about closing the shop door every day at 4 o’clock. But it feels different going to work and earning a decent living. Even abroad, medics don’t have the highest salaries but still they can create decent living conditions for their families” – resident doctor in Germany.

“When I started considering leaving the country, I was influenced by the over solicitation that I was exposed to in the hospital back home. This manifested itself as physical illness (diabetes and lack of sleep). Complaining to my employer brought no results. Considering my own health and the future of my family, I started to apply for positions abroad.”

“For 6 years I have been working and living abroad. Most of the doctors working abroad would gladly come back home, if they would feel themselves welcomed back.” – Specialist doctor UK.

“If the year of my graduation (2008) had presented a better home situation, I wouldn’t have started applying for jobs abroad. It is sad that I had to leave my home country but here I don’t have to worry about bills, rent costs, my car, cloths, vacations and even saving up some money. “– resident UK

“My worse memory from back home is tightly correlated to the constant bribes. I was allergic to them and was quite terrified when people kept insisting to take the money.” – specialist USA.

“During my years as a student, I was against migration. (My girlfriend is also a doctor and we graduated together). After graduation we worked together in Hungary. We lived together with her mom in order to be able to pay utilities. We had no time and no money for fun. Working overtime didn’t pay off either, and there was no chance to start a family. Once, a patient tried to beat me up. The last drop filled my cup of disappointments. Even though I loved my colleagues I decided to go abroad. Having an independent life, my own car, future perspectives, and a life outside the hospital improved our life.” –resident Germany.

“If we continue to postpone the resolving remuneration issues in Hungary, we will have to lose an entire generation, and then young doctors will not have any other motivation to stay home because they won’t have any mentors back here to teach them the art of medicine”- specialist UK.

 

Source of the article

Online waiting lists form July

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

July brings Hungary the first online national waiting list registration system, a system that is meant to be easy to keep track of, highlighting the number of people waiting for various operations throughout the country. 

Zsolt Kiss, the National Health Insurance Fund Strategic Head of the Division of MTI, stated that the new system is a key element for patient choice, because the patient will always follow the money. For example, by accessing the national register and the NHS, a patient can see the institutions in which a certain procedure in made, and can also see the number of patients in front of him waiting for the same procedure. This knowledge will give the patient the capacity to choose the institution.

As explained, the National Health Insurance Fund managed by the new system will be able to keep track of the waiting lists, of the needed treatments and costs of treatments, for example number of painkillers needed for each patient, what kind of care for chronic treatment was received, how many sick days, etc.

The totals, together with the surgery itself provide a clearer image of what the total necessary costs will be.
Zsolt Kiss emphasized that for example in the case of spinal surgery where the waiting list is for years, the NHS will redirect its capacity to eliminate these disparities. Meanwhile the basic rules do not change, said the Head of Department.

All in all the leading institutions are therefore pleased with the new concept of a more transparent system, with rules that disable doctors to forward some patients up the list without purely technical reasons.

The new registration system for the NHS is based on the principle of responsible management of the waiting lists. Zsolt Kiss emphasized that the hospital information system is already there, it just needs to be launched on a nation-wide basis in order to fill out the lists.

source of the article

Mass Resignation of Doctors Cancelled

Monday, January 9th, 2012

A pro-government commentator is relieved by the fact that the government at the very last moment promised significant wage rises for doctors. The doctors had threatened to quit their jobs en masse on January 1.

“The imminent collapse of the Hungarian health care has been averted” – writes Ronald Lippai in Magyar Nemzet.

More than 2,500 Hungarian trainee doctors who earn less than 90,000 Forints (290 Euros) a month threatened to quit their jobs on January 1, 2012, unless the government offers them a significant salary increase.

On December 29, the Undersecretary of Health Miklos Szocska promised that the government would allocate 40 billion Forints to increase their salaries. The Hungarian Trainee Doctors’ Association welcomed the announcement, and put off the planned mass resignation for three months in hope that an agreement with the government will be reached in the meantime.

Lippai contends that the run-down Hungarian health care system can hardly be fixed in a couple of months. He finds it promising, however, that the government has realized the urgency of the problem and offered help in order to avoid the complete breakdown of the service.

As for the young doctors’ unusually harsh threats, he notes that these well-qualified medical professionals are fully aware that they could easily get well-paid jobs in Western-European countries. But they would prefer to work in Hungary and earn a living without accepting tips, which is rather widespread in the state-run healthcare system.

All in all, Lippai hopes that the three month deadline will be enough to find an agreement which would not only be beneficial for the young doctors, but also essential for the viability of the Hungarian health care system.

 

Source of the article here: http://budapost.eu/2012/01/mass-resignation-of-doctors-cancelled/

Hungary counts the growing cost of brain drain

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

 

July 8, 2011 – Hungarian radiology has become trapped in a vicious circle: A combination of low prestige, long hours, and, most especially, low wages is driving a brain drain of the most experienced specialists to find work abroad, in particular to the Republic of Ireland, Scandinavia, the UK and Germany, according to one of the country’s leading practitioner.

Gabor Forrai, PhD, heads Hungary’s biggest radiology department in one of its newest, best equipped establishments, the AEK military hospital in Budapest. Trainee doctors want to work there; the environment is good, its reputation high and the cases interesting. Last year a call to fill two trainee posts resulted in 24 applicants. The problem lies in finding qualified staff. Up to four senior posts have been open in the same department for two years, without a single applicant. The situation is mirrored in every hospital in the country, Forrai said.

“Because of the shortage of experienced specialists, the workload is heavy. Every doctor who goes abroad compounds the problem, and the trend is getting worse,” he said. He himself has lost seven radiologists to other countries in the EU in the past three years. A university hospital department head recently told him that of seven residents now in the second year, four had said they were leaving to work abroad. “From my departem in the last four months, three doctors have left, one young, just after specializing and two over 50. It is tragic,” he said.

Doctors have always been attracted by the opportunities of working abroad, of course. In the mid ‘90s, Forrai spent time in France and Germany. But prior to the EU’s accession of Hungary, taking up a permanent position would have required complete retraining, lasting six years. “That’s not so funny when you are already in your 30s and have already qualified once,” he said.

Since 2004, when Hungary became an EU member, its qualifications have been recognized in the rest of the union, as have the quality of its training and the skills of its specialists – and that has fueled the growing exodus. Forrai is a board member of the Hungarian Society of Radiologists. A country with a population of 10 million has an estimated 900 active registered radiologists, but between 100 and 150 of those work abroad. Three years ago, the figure was 53. “Last year, there were 18 radiology specialists who applied to the medical chamber for the documentation they need to work abroad,” he said. Even that doesn’t paint the full picture, though, because the growing trend of teleradiology is sucking yet more from the system – specialists who live in Hungary but spend their time remotely reporting on MR and CT scans for the Republic of Ireland, the UK and other nations.

“I know five to 10 Hungarian doctors who will earn two to three times as much working for a few hours reporting CTs via the Internet than they will in a six-or eight-hour day at the hospital,” Forrai said.

Nor is the brain drain unique to radiology; it affects all three pillars of diagnostic medicine, with pathologists and laboratory specialists also in increasingly short supply. “There is a hospital in Sweden where the entire pathology department, six or seven doctors, is Hungarian, and team meetings are held in Hungarian,” he reported.

Norway, in particular, has embraced the fruits of Hungarian medical training. It is not uncommon to find Norwegian students in this country’s university hospitals. While Norway’s four oldest universities (Bergen, Oslo, Tromso and Trondheim) all have faculties or schools of medicine, there is no specialized university dedicated to medicine alone. “It’s easier and cheaper to recruit our specialists, Forrai added.

The Hungarian Medical Chamber appears to welcome foreign headhunters to the country (recruiting conferences are held in the capital, and language courses are offered for those who need them), he said. Forrai believes the chamber passes on contact details for direct mailing. “I get three or four letters every year. I’m not against people working abroad; I’ve done it myself. I’m quite open-minded, and my son is studying in France now, but I don’t think it’s our job to help recruit for other countries.”

Such is the mess of the country’s healthcare system that there can be no quick fix. By law, social security contributions to healthcare funds do not cover amortization or replacement of equipment, but running costs only. Every state hospital owes millions of forints to its medical suppliers. Partly as a consequence, doctors here are near the bottom of EU salary scales.

The average salary for a young qualified radiologist will be in the region of 565 euros per month before tax, Forrai said. An experienced radiologist in his or her 40s would be doing well to pull down 940 euros, while doctors in their 50s earn 1,120 euros per month.

Two-thirds of medical students want to leave Hungary for western countries where they can earn up to 10 times as much, according to a survey by the increasingly vocal Hungarian Residents’ Association, which represents junior doctors. Magor Papp, the head of the association, told state news agency MTI earlier this year that a resident doctor’s average monthly take-home pay for 60-70 hours of work per week is no more than 300 euros – a sum he said was equivalent to the pay of a street sweeper.

A radiologist will attract a bigger salary than an average general practitioner, of course, but not by much, and that isn’t the whole story. For the past 50 years, Hungarian healthcare has operated on a “pocket money” system. Healthcare is free at the point of service, but patients are expected to pay all clinical medical workers a gratuity. As it isn’t declared, no tax is paid, but everyone seems to accept this situation. Since radiologists rarely have a personal relationship with their patients, it is an extra channel of income that isn’t available to them. Experienced specialists, even the heads of Hungary’s university hospital departments, routinely hold down second or third jobs. “In Hungary, a vet is better paid than a doctor,” Forrai remarked.

Copyright © 2011 AuntMinnieEurope.com

Source of the article here: http://www.auntminnieeurope.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=imc&pag=dis&ItemID=605276&wf=55

THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN FRANCE AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA AND LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Given the fact that you considered our previous comparison study: “The cost of living comparison between Germany and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Lithuania” useful, here, we present you the sequel.

Continuing on the same idea, you are a specialist doctor (because France only recruits specialists), you like the French lifestyle, culture, language and everything France has to offer and consider continuing your medical career in France!

So we, the EGV Recruiting Team, present to you the cost of living comparison between France and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Lithuania:

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 12.04€ in France

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 46.59€ in France

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 1.04€ in France

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is about 1.23€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 8.69€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.57€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.25€
Transportation:
A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 47.47€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.81€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 1.43€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 95.45€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.36€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 29.72€

 

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in France the monthly fee is 57.56€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in France the fee is 17.15€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 9.21€

 

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost about 79.57€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 32.14€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost 98.46€

 

Rent per month:
The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 486.60€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 938.51€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

 

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in France 1938.11€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in France it is 4.10%
In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in France, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in France 165.46% higher than in Romania, 148.36% higher than in Hungary, 176.79% higher than in Bulgaria, 83.28% higher than in Slovakia and 171.38% higher than in Lithuania.

Now that we painted a picture, and if you found the article relevant, you can reward us with a like on our page www.facebook.com/EGVpage and maybe you can even apply for a job from our job section on our page or you can add us as a friend www.facebook.com/EGVprofile

Remember! Your feedback motivates us to bring you articles like this!

THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN GERMANY AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA, LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

So let’s say you are a doctor living in Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia or Lithuania. By now I guess you know all about the shortcomings of the healthcare system in your country, about the general smaller wages than in Germany and about the other things that make you consider a career abroad.

You have your medical diploma, you might already speak the German language at a B2 level, and if you are determined enough you might want to start or continue your medical career as a resident or specialist doctor in Germany.
Considering the fact that we live in the XXI century, I bet that you start to gather information from the internet such as job offers, wages, recruitment agencies, information regarding different areas of Germany, school costs for your children, rent costs, etc.
Most recruitment agencies inform you about a lot of benefits, but here at EGV Recruiting, we like to go the extra mile and share a perspective about the living costs in your country in comparison to living costs in Germany.

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 8.25€ in Germany

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 38.3€ in Germany

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 0.73€ in Germany

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is about 1.72€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 6.98€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 2.28€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 0.92€

Transportation:

A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 54.70€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.49€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.48€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 128.62€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 0.14€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 22.53€

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the monthly fee is 44.27€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the fee is 15.76€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 8.41€

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost about 83.54€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 34.62€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost 91.14€

Rent per month:

The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 376.07€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 773.25€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany 2,104.90€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in Germany it is 4.11%

In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in Germany, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in Germany 240.49% higher than in Romania, 214.14% higher than in Hungary, 245.06% higher than in Bulgaria, 133.69% higher than in Slovakia and 250.03% higher than in Lithuania. 

 

 

FRUSTRATED EASTERN EUROPEAN DOCTORS HEAD WEST

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

More and more eastern European doctors are heading west as government economic austerity measures eat into their pay and conditions deteriorate, leaving behind understaffed health systems in crisis.

From Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania, growing numbers of physicians, surgeons, anesthetists and other specialists are packing up for countries like Britain, Germany and Sweden.

“There are no prospects for me in Hungary,” said surgeon Csaba Andok, who is in his 50’. “I am leaving for Germany where my work is appreciated.” Last year 1,111 physicians applied to the Hungarian government for a certificate allowing them to work abroad.

This may represent just a fraction of the country’s 30.000 practicing doctors but, in a worrying trend for the future, it involves many of the 800 new graduates every year.

“Discontent is widespread among doctors, primarily due to deteriorating salary conditions”, Andok said. “Our caseloads have increased over the past year, but we still get the same pay, 550-740Euros per month, a salary comparable to that of a waiter in a trendy café. Work is carried out by a very limited staff and the shortage of personnel makes daily pressure unbearable,” Andok said.

The economic crisis that hit Hungary in 2008 led the government to impose stiff austerity measures, including a sales tax hike, the scraping of 13th month annual bonuses and reduced heating subsidies.

The picture is not rosier in Romania where medical professionals have seen their salaries cut by at least 13 percent since the government introduced cost-cutting measures last July. The number of doctors wanting to leave the country almost doubled in 2010 to 2.779 from the previous year, according to the official figures.

In Bulgaria, nurses are leaving at the rate of 1.200 per year, estimates the association of medical professionals. They earn about 400-500 leva (205-255Euros) per month, several times less than the average pay of nurses in Britain.

The exodus is hammering the healthcare system in the EU’s poorest member states, in which the health ministry says has around half the 60.000 nurses the association of medical professional says it needs to function properly.

The Bulgarian emergency and anesthesia services are particularly hurt by the departure of hundreds of doctors a year, according to the union officials. Small hospitals meanwhile lack basic equipment and material, come even asking patients to bring along their own sheets.

In Estonia the complaints that push professionals to consider emigration are less about salaries than about standards and disheartening bureaucracy.

“The current health system in Estonia is a lot like it was during the Soviet era, with bureaucrats deciding how and for what funds are given,” said doctor Ivo Kolts, who also teaches anatomy at Tartu University.

“Estonian hospitals are often interested in making useless analyses and computer screenings because the state pays for such studies, regardless of whether a patient needs them or not. The quality of treatment is often not the priority.”

Desperate Hungarian doctors say they are considering resorting to drastic tactics such as their Czech colleagues: around 3000 of them handed out their resignations en masse in December. The action prompted the government to agree to several pay rises until 2013.

Hungary’s center-right government led by Prime Minister Viktor Orban says they are working to improve work conditions for the healthcare employees, but the details remain vague.

In the meantime retired doctors are being called back into service to fill vacant posts particularly in the countryside.

The governments in Bulgaria and Romania have not said how they plan to stop the mass exodus.

Poland has managed to stem a similar outflow of medical staff since 2005 by increasing salaries and investing in training, with some professionals now choosing to return.

 

Source of the article here: http://www.eubusiness.com/news-eu/eeurope-health.9da

 

 

 

BUDAPEST PLANS ON FORCING STATE FUNDED STUDENTS TO STAY IN HUNGARY

Friday, October 28th, 2011

BUDAPEST – The European Students’ Union (ESU) is deeply concerned about the new law proposal from Hungarian government to force young graduates to work in Hungary from 7 up to 20 years after their graduation. This would apply to all students who receive funding from the state. If they would decide to work abroad, they would have to pay all costs of their studies back. According to ESU this could be a violation of EU law and it asks the European Commission to start a profound investigation.

The draft piece of legislation has been pot together without any official consultation of HÖOK, the national union of Hungarian students, member of ESU.  HÖOK is planning demonstrations against the proposals on 27 October, in Budapest. , ESU Chairman, who will attend the demonstration, said: “If Hungary demands students to sign contracts forcing them to work only in Hungary after graduation, then this is a direct restriction on the right to free movement, which is one of the corner-stones of the EU.”

Päll continued: “If students are forced to pay the state funding back if they decide to work abroad, then this is as an indirect restriction, which also goes against the right to free movement. We are very curious to hear what Brussels thinks about this proposals and whether Hungary has discussed any of these with them.”

 

Reduction of students

The number of students financed by the state will also be significantly reduced meaning that less people will have the chance to study. The number is set to fall from 54.000 students in 2011 to 25.000 students in 2012. The rest of the students will have to pay the full costs of their studies, causing difficulties for many.

In some fields of study the number of financed student places will decrease to zero (for instance law, economics, arts) and students will have to pay two to three times higher tuition fees. This is also restricting the freedom of universities to teach, and students to choose appropriate studies, not to mention increasing the societal inequity. Up until today, the universities themselves could decide on tuition fees but in the new law, the state will decide about the cost of a study field.

 

Less student participation

Lastly, the number of student representatives in decision-making bodies will decrease to 1-20 percent instead of 25-33 percent which is right now. Veto rights concerning study affairs will also be banned if the new law will make it through.

Source of the article here: http://www.esu-online.org/news/article/6001/565/