Archive for the ‘Lithuania’ Category

Mankind does not have the right to suffer

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

In Lithuania, the constitutional right to free medical treatment is just a formality. In fact much of the health care services provided are paid from the pockets of the patients. The fact that medical institutions are illegally robbing the funds allocated for healthcare is no secret for the family members of the ill, to the Ministry of Health and the State Patient Fund (SPF). However not much is done to resolve this delicate matter.

How ill?

The examination of the Thyroid costs 9 euro, a sonogram costs 15 euro, and without a prescription from your doctor it can cost around 50 euro. The drugs cost at least 30 euro, and that’s just the start of the treatment. Sestokiene Gitana suffers from kidney stones. She says she does not understand why she has to pay the compulsory health insurance (CHI) fee, if she can’t get help in her time of need. This is the second month she’s been waiting for her ultrasound examination, a procedure recommended to undertake in maximum 10 days, also she might have to wait for another month. The family doctor recommended her to call the ambulance if anything bad happens that puts her in a life threatening situation, since non-life threatening cases are best handled by private institutions.

“Thank God that I have a job and I can afford the treatment. But what if I was a pensioner? What would people do if they are currently jobless? Surprisingly it has come so far that hospitals only treat life threatening situations.”

“We do not have enough money allocated for treatment and diagnosis of oncological diseases. There is simply no money. Not anyone can afford to pay 30-60 euro to make sure that they are not suffering of anything. Patients with malignant diseases should have savings… It is true that drugs can be reimbursed for any of them, but not all patients live near the hospital or even in the city, and travel costs are not reimbursed. Also with such a disease people are not fit to travel and not able to work”, Stated cancer patient Ingrid Pasvenskiene.

Health – a matter of money

“It is only a declaration that the treatment in Lithuania is free. In fact the same patient pays for health several times: once to the CHI, then there are the travel costs to the doctor and then the possibility that the drugs you need won’t be reimbursed. Regarding the so called free treatment, there is only one thing I can state: There are no satisfied patients in Lithuania”

Patients in the medical institutions are often manipulated. For example, a doctor warned that the study will have to wait a month and a half, however if you agree to pay for it, it can start in a week. Even if the SPF compensates for a cure for the disease, it is usually the cheapest treatment possible.

“They say that asthmatics are lucky, because the medicines are reimbursed. However, the treatment even for just a week can cost from 60 to 600 euros”, E. Kvedaraite asthma patient.

“The treatment has become a service. These services are physically out of control, while useful and profitable.”

You could say that every time you open the door of a medical institution you also have to open your wallet.

 

Source of the article here:
http://www.respublika.lt/lt/naujienos/mokslas/sveikata/zmogus_neturi_teises_sirgti/

Lithuania – Choosing medical care

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012


Like in most European countries, individuals have the right to choose their own family doctor and medicine, but for some reason the Lithuanian Ministry of Health does not believe that patients should have the right to choose medical care providers such as hospitals.

Nearly two years ago the Ministry of Health changed the prescription drug legislation. The changes underline the fact that prescriptions should be given according to the generic active ingredient rather than a specific manufacturer’s product name. The ministry stressed that the changes will provide the patient more freedom of choice.  So, a person can choose a cheaper product, or the one that helped him previously.

Regarding the recognition of the right to choose the health provider services, for some reason, the ministry of health does not believe that one should have the right of choice. Specifically, one can choose the hospital, but he may have to pay the full price of the service, even if he previously paid the mandatory health insurance contribution. This happens in case the patient selects the hospital to which patients did not fund the contract for hospital services. As it seems, the money follows the patient in the choice for family doctors, but it does not follow him if he wants to choose a different hospital. The consequence of such funding flaws is the fact that private healthcare providers are scarce. If the EU average of private beds per thousand people is 210, in Lithuania it is only 3.

Obstacles to the free human choice is the current contract with medical institutions regarding signing procedures established by the ministry of health.  You may say that this contract exists in order to protect the institutions form discrimination, and there is nothing wrong with that, but the patient should come first. The problem with the Health Insurance Fund has already drawn attention to the Competition Council, which initiated an investigation.

 

Are you Lithuanian? Could you please tell us more about this system?

 

 

Source of the article here:

http://www.lzinios.lt/Komentarai-ir-debatai/Apie-pasirinkimo-galimybes-medicinoje

Medical news from the Baltic states

Friday, January 27th, 2012


BALTIC COUNTRIES COULD ORGANIZE JOINT PROCUREMENT OF MEDICATIONS AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

Saeima Economic, Agricultural, Environmental and Regional Policy Committee approved in principle amendments to the Public Procurement Law, so the Baltic countries could jointly organize procurement of medications and medical equipment.

This joint procurement procedure will make it possible for the Baltic countries to buy medications and medical equipment at lower prices, thereby saving state budget funds. The committee’s bill has been submitted to parliament, with the committee requesting that the bill be reviewed as soon as possible.

 

ESTONIA SPENT LESS ON HEALTHCARE IN 2010

 

According to the Estonian Health Development Institute (HDI) health statistics department, the total share of healthcare spending in the state’s GDP fell to 6.3% in 2010 being 908.1 million Euros in current prices.

As compared to 2009, it was a 0.7% fall. It was caused by general fall of healthcare spending and 3.4% growth of GDP. Since 1999, when statistical data collection on Estonia’s healthcare total spending was launched, till 2008, the total spending grew each year but since 2009, a fall took place.

The initial data on 2011 healthcare spending will be revealed in December 2012.

 

40% OF ESTONIA’S PATIENTS WATI MORE THAT A MONTH TO VISIT A MEDICAL DOCTOR!

 

In Estonia, 28% of the patients have to wait a week to call on a medical doctor, 31% have to wait eight days to a month, and 39% have to wait longer than a month to see the doctor, reports the Estonian news portal ERR, referring to a governmental study.

During the economic recession, queues for appointments with specialized physicians got significantly longer, concluded a government poll. Around 12% of respondents said they visited a private health care clinic because lines in the public care system were so long, and the quality of medical treatment is better in the private sector.

Also, since 2009, visits with dentists, nurses, and specialists have been on the decline, mainly because of economic hardship, according to the poll.

 

Are you a doctor from the Baltic states?

Could you perhaps give more insights on this topic? It’s time to hear your opinion!

 

 

Source of the article here:

http://www.baltic-course.com/eng/markets_and_companies/?doc=51771

http://www.baltic-course.com/eng/markets_and_companies/?doc=51326

http://www.baltic-course.com/eng/markets_and_companies/?doc=51419

 

 

 

THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN FRANCE AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA AND LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Given the fact that you considered our previous comparison study: “The cost of living comparison between Germany and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Lithuania” useful, here, we present you the sequel.

Continuing on the same idea, you are a specialist doctor (because France only recruits specialists), you like the French lifestyle, culture, language and everything France has to offer and consider continuing your medical career in France!

So we, the EGV Recruiting Team, present to you the cost of living comparison between France and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Lithuania:

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 12.04€ in France

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 46.59€ in France

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 1.04€ in France

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is about 1.23€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 8.69€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.57€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.25€
Transportation:
A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 47.47€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.81€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 1.43€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 95.45€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.36€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 29.72€

 

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in France the monthly fee is 57.56€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in France the fee is 17.15€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 9.21€

 

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost about 79.57€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 32.14€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost 98.46€

 

Rent per month:
The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 486.60€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 938.51€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

 

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in France 1938.11€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in France it is 4.10%
In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in France, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in France 165.46% higher than in Romania, 148.36% higher than in Hungary, 176.79% higher than in Bulgaria, 83.28% higher than in Slovakia and 171.38% higher than in Lithuania.

Now that we painted a picture, and if you found the article relevant, you can reward us with a like on our page www.facebook.com/EGVpage and maybe you can even apply for a job from our job section on our page or you can add us as a friend www.facebook.com/EGVprofile

Remember! Your feedback motivates us to bring you articles like this!

THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN GERMANY AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA, LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

So let’s say you are a doctor living in Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia or Lithuania. By now I guess you know all about the shortcomings of the healthcare system in your country, about the general smaller wages than in Germany and about the other things that make you consider a career abroad.

You have your medical diploma, you might already speak the German language at a B2 level, and if you are determined enough you might want to start or continue your medical career as a resident or specialist doctor in Germany.
Considering the fact that we live in the XXI century, I bet that you start to gather information from the internet such as job offers, wages, recruitment agencies, information regarding different areas of Germany, school costs for your children, rent costs, etc.
Most recruitment agencies inform you about a lot of benefits, but here at EGV Recruiting, we like to go the extra mile and share a perspective about the living costs in your country in comparison to living costs in Germany.

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 8.25€ in Germany

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 38.3€ in Germany

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 0.73€ in Germany

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is about 1.72€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 6.98€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 2.28€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 0.92€

Transportation:

A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 54.70€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.49€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.48€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 128.62€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 0.14€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 22.53€

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the monthly fee is 44.27€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the fee is 15.76€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 8.41€

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost about 83.54€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 34.62€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost 91.14€

Rent per month:

The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 376.07€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 773.25€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany 2,104.90€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in Germany it is 4.11%

In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in Germany, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in Germany 240.49% higher than in Romania, 214.14% higher than in Hungary, 245.06% higher than in Bulgaria, 133.69% higher than in Slovakia and 250.03% higher than in Lithuania.