Archive for the ‘Slovakia’ Category

SLOVAKIA HEALTH SYSTEM IN CRISIS AS DOCTORS WALK OUT

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

Bratislava, Dec 1st (Reuters) – Slovak healthcare unions warned on Thursday the country’s medical sector may disintegrate after doctors walked out due to an ongoing dispute over wage hikes, forcing the government to ask neighbouring countries for medical support.

Around one fifth of country’s 7000 doctors did not show up for work, according to Slovak media, in a protest that mirrors industrial action in recent years in the Czech Republic and Hungary, where doctors have also long campaigned to bring their wages closer to west European standards.

Euro zone member Slovakia introduced a state of emergency at 15 selected hospitals this week – forcing staff to show up under threat of penalties – after doctors rejected an offer to raise their monthly salaries by 300 Euros (400$).

The average monthly pay for doctors in Slovakia is around 1,500 Euros, according to data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

“The result of the government’s stance is  a critical situation in Slovakia’s hospitals,” Marian Kollar, head of the doctors’ unions told reporters Thursday.

Slovakia, which has been struggling to reform its health system since becoming independent in 1993, asked its neighbours on Wednesday to send doctors to reinforce its medical facilities. The Czech Republic will debate on Friday plans to provide army doctors.

Slovakia has asked Hungary to send extra staff to hospitals close to their common border, but Hungary also faces threats by some 2,500 young doctors to leave the country unless their monthly wages are lifted by 100,000 Hungarian forints (440$)

Slovak Health Minister Ivan Uhliarik who offered to resign after talks with union leaders failed on Thursday, said Poland and Austria were also ready to help.

 

LOW PAY

Slovakia, whose debt is about half the European average at over 40 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), is aiming to keep its fiscal consolidation on track in the face of the bloc’s debt crisis and vanishing growth.

An opinion poll showed more than half of the country thought doctors should settle for what the government was offering, given the bleak economic environment.

“Doctors should consider the country’s current situation and avoid unreal and impossible demands… They are not the only ones whose job carries a level of responsibility,” said 31-year-old project manager Natalia Ulrichova.

Many Slovak doctors – like their Czech counterparts – have moved abroad to increase their wages.

Elena Horthova, a 51-year-old doctor who now works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, said Slovak doctors were underpaid compared to the other EU states.

“I used to work for 48 hours non-stop. You get eight newborns on ventilation, 4 patients intakes, 2 acute anesthesia and then you get home after two days, wasted, and you have nothing to feed your kids,” she said.

 

Source of the article here:

http://www.trust.org/alertnet/news/slovakia-health-system-in-crisis-as-doctors-walk-out

THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN FRANCE AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA AND LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Given the fact that you considered our previous comparison study: “The cost of living comparison between Germany and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Lithuania” useful, here, we present you the sequel.

Continuing on the same idea, you are a specialist doctor (because France only recruits specialists), you like the French lifestyle, culture, language and everything France has to offer and consider continuing your medical career in France!

So we, the EGV Recruiting Team, present to you the cost of living comparison between France and Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Lithuania:

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 12.04€ in France

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 46.59€ in France

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 1.04€ in France

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is about 1.23€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 8.69€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.57€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 1.25€
Transportation:
A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 47.47€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.81€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 1.43€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 95.45€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 0.36€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 29.72€

 

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in France the monthly fee is 57.56€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in France the fee is 17.15€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in France the price is 9.21€

 

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost about 79.57€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in France it costs about 32.14€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in France they cost 98.46€

 

Rent per month:
The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 486.60€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in France the rent price is about 938.51€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

 

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in France 1938.11€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in France it is 4.10%
In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in France, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in France 165.46% higher than in Romania, 148.36% higher than in Hungary, 176.79% higher than in Bulgaria, 83.28% higher than in Slovakia and 171.38% higher than in Lithuania.

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THE COST OF LIVING COMPARISON BETWEEN GERMANY AND ROMANIA, HUNGARY, BULGARIA, SLOVAKIA, LITHUANIA

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

So let’s say you are a doctor living in Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia or Lithuania. By now I guess you know all about the shortcomings of the healthcare system in your country, about the general smaller wages than in Germany and about the other things that make you consider a career abroad.

You have your medical diploma, you might already speak the German language at a B2 level, and if you are determined enough you might want to start or continue your medical career as a resident or specialist doctor in Germany.
Considering the fact that we live in the XXI century, I bet that you start to gather information from the internet such as job offers, wages, recruitment agencies, information regarding different areas of Germany, school costs for your children, rent costs, etc.
Most recruitment agencies inform you about a lot of benefits, but here at EGV Recruiting, we like to go the extra mile and share a perspective about the living costs in your country in comparison to living costs in Germany.

Restaurant prices:

A meal at an inexpensive restaurant would cost you about:
– 4.07€ in Romania
– 4.87€ in Hungary
– 4.17€ in Bulgaria
– 4.42€ in Slovakia
– 5.27€ in Lithuania
– 8.25€ in Germany

A three-course meal for two, at a mid-ranged restaurant costs you:
– 16.84€ in Romania
– 25.58€ in Hungary
– 16.85€ in Bulgaria
– 19.89€ in Slovakia
– 21.98€ in Lithuania
– 38.3€ in Germany

Market prices:

1 Liter of milk costs about:
– 0.83€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.92€ in Bulgaria
– 0.68€ in Slovakia
– 0.73€ in Lithuania
– 0.73€ in Germany

Fresh white Bread costs about:
– 0.50€ in Romania
– 0.73€ in Hungary
– 0.47€ in Bulgaria
– 0.89€ in Slovakia
– 0.86€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is about 1.72€

1 kilogram of chicken breasts costs about:
– 3.99€ in Romania
– 4.90€ in Hungary
– 4.75€ in Bulgaria
– 5.28€ in Slovakia
– 6.30€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 6.98€

1 kilogram of oranges costs about:
– 1.02€ in Romania
– 1.21€ in Hungary
– 1.32€ in Bulgaria
– 1.21€ in Slovakia
– 1.16€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 2.28€

1 kilogram of potatoes costs about:
– 0.46€ in Romania
– 0.45€ in Hungary
– 0.48€ in Bulgaria
– 0.37€ in Slovakia
– 0.41€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 0.92€

Transportation:

A monthly pass for the local transport system costs:
– 13.35€ in Romania
– 32.68€ in Hungary
– 19.17€ in Bulgaria
– 22.46€ in Slovakia
– 30.25€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 54.70€

1 km with a taxi with normal tariff costs about:
– 0.36€ in Romania
– 0.76€ in Hungary
– 0.41€ in Bulgaria
– 0.81€ in Slovakia
– 0.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.49€

1 liter of gasoline costs about:
– 1.21€ in Romania
– 1.32€ in Hungary
– 1.21€ in Bulgaria
– 1.43€ in Slovakia
– 1.27€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 1.48€

Monthly utilities:

Basic electricity, water, gas and garbage costs about:
– 58.59€ in Romania
– 126.93€ in Hungary
– 70.24€ in Bulgaria
– 94.00€ in Slovakia
– 121.93€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 128.62€

1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff costs about:
– 0.13€ in Romania
– 0.12€ in Hungary
– 0.17€ in Bulgaria
– 0.13€ in Slovakia
– 0.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 0.14€

Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL) costs:
– 6.75€ in Romania
– 17.20€ in Hungary
– 10.42€ in Bulgaria
– 17.07€ in Slovakia
– 12.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 22.53€

Sports and leisure:

The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center is:
– 24.34€ in Romania
– 32.46€ in Hungary
– 33.87€ in Bulgaria
– 35.71€ in Slovakia
– 41.51€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the monthly fee is 44.27€

1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend costs about:
– 10.02€ in Romania
– 8.61€ in Hungary
– 8.00€ in Bulgaria
– 7.33€ in Slovakia
– 15.21€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the fee is 15.76€

1 seat in the cinema for an international release costs about:
– 4.35€ in Romania
– 4.97€ in Hungary
– 4.37€ in Bulgaria
– 5.98€ in Slovakia
– 5.38€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the price is 8.41€

Clothing and shoes:

1 pair of Levis 501 costs:
– 67.62€ in Romania
– 73.55€ in Hungary
– 76.68€ in Bulgaria
– 69.71€ in Slovakia
– 70.34€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost about 83.54€

1 summer dress from a chain store (Zara H&M) costs:
– 37.63€ in Romania
– 45.58€ in Hungary
– 35.97€ in Bulgaria
– 49.50€ in Slovakia
– 48.91€ in Lithuania
– in Germany it costs about 34.62€

1 Pair of men leather shoes cost:
– 55.15€ in Romania
– 62.53€ in Hungary
– 47.65€ in Bulgaria
– 74.00€ in Slovakia
– 83.02€ in Lithuania
– in Germany they cost 91.14€

Rent per month:

The rent for a 1 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 172.97€ in Romania
– 158.22€ in Hungary
– 164.15€ in Bulgaria
– 318.57€ in Slovakia
– 170.29€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 376.07€

The rent for a 3 bedroom apartment costs about:
– 283.39€ in Romania
– 331.66€ in Hungary
– 305.80€ in Bulgaria
– 508.11€ in Slovakia
– 375.42€ in Lithuania
– in Germany the rent price is about 773.25€

 

This does not mean you can’t find cheaper alternatives!!!

Salaries and financing:

The median monthly disposable salary after tax is:
– 334.11€ in Romania
– 444.53€ in Hungary
– 352.32€ in Bulgaria
– 632.53€ in Slovakia
– 426.11€ in Lithuania
– in Germany 2,104.90€

The yearly mortgage interest rate is:
– 8.61% in Romania
– 7.50% in Hungary
– 8.75% in Bulgaria
– 5.33% in Slovakia
– 9.75% in Lithuania
– in Germany it is 4.11%

In conclusion, although most living expenses are higher in Germany, the salaries are also much higher, making the local purchasing power in Germany 240.49% higher than in Romania, 214.14% higher than in Hungary, 245.06% higher than in Bulgaria, 133.69% higher than in Slovakia and 250.03% higher than in Lithuania. 

 

 

SLOVAK DOCTOR THREATEN MASS RESIGNATION

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

 

The first 4 months of 2011 have been challenging for Slovakia’s healthcare sector and, with Germany and Austria opening their labor markets, fear of an eventual mass exodus of Slovak doctors and other health-care professionals have now intensified. Nevertheless, the Ministry of Health says that it does not expect any such flight.

 

Meanwhile, Slovak physicians are now warning that they may submit mass resignation notices to their employers to demonstrate their frustration over poor pay and low status, following the example of their Czech colleagues who used a similar tactic earlier this year.

 

The idea was initiated by the Medical Trade Unions Association (LOZ), which counts 2.000 members out of approximately 18.000 physicians across Slovakia.

 

While it’s unclear how many physicians might submit such notices, Michal Polician, the chairman of LOZ, told the SITA newswire that he expects physicians who are not members of LOZ to join the protest. Its exact timing, however, is unclear.

 

“The Ministry of Health does not expect there to be mass submissions of notice,” Health Ministry spokesperson Katarina Zollerova told The Slovak Spectator.

 

Zollerova said the ministry found the threat of possible mass resignation surprising, noting that it has been engaged in intense dialogue with all stakeholders in the health-care sector and that during past meetings the trade union had given no indication of a plan to submit notice en masse.

 

Polician said the unions are not bypassing further dialogue with the ministry but added that the threat of mass resignation could be ended only if the government meets the health-care union’s demands.

 

These include observance of the restrictions on working hours in the Labor Code and a halt in the government’s current plans to transform state-owned hospitals into joint-stock companies as well as a gradual increase in health-care workers’ salaries so that they reach between 1.5 and three times the average wage by 2013 depending on qualifications.

 

Anton Szalay, the chairman of the Trade Union of Medical and Social Services Employees (SOZZaSS), told the Slovak Spectator that his union will talk whit Polician on May 19 to discuss the protest action. Szalay stated he considers the option of submitting notice en masse a very last resort option but added that his union will survey its member about their attitudes towards the tactic.

 

Szalay said that all the 10 organisations associated with his trade union support the demand that financing issues in health care are resolved. “We see the greatest shortcoming in the fact that the government’s budget has approved payments from the state for insurance policy holders at 4.32 percent as compared with the previously applied 4.78 percent,” Szalay said.

 

He stated that it is necessary for the government to find an additional 126 million Euro for health-care institutions, saving this is the shortfall caused by the reduction in the state’s contribution on behalf of those individuals it insures.

 

The Ministry of Health said it considers it to be unethical and inappropriate for physicians to use patients as hostages during negotiations over resolving the vexing issues in the health-care sector.

 

“The physicians are late by at least four years when under the previous government no progress was made within the health-care ministry,” said Zollerova, adding that the current government had taken over a sector laden with debts exceeding 200 million Euro.

 

The time for negotiations is over, said Milan Dragula, the president of the Slovak Chamber of Physicians, in evaluating the outcome of the meeting taking place on the 10th of May between the representatives of medical organisations and the trade unions with the Slovak parliament’s committee on health care.

 

The health-care representatives said they wanted to discuss methods to cover the debts of health-care institutions but were dissatisfied with the results of the meeting. Dragula said the next steps taken by health care workers should be more resolute.

“There are many issues involved and it also depends on the moods of the healthcare employees,” said Dragula.

 

Both physicians and nurses are demanding more funding from the state budget and they have proposed that the resources can be found from programmes for accident insurance and sick leave insurance, or from excise taxes on alcohol andtobacco. They are also proposing that beginning in 2012, monthly payments for health insurance should be set at the level of 5.5 percent, SITA reported.

 

Zollerová said the Health Ministry agrees with most of the demands by health-care employees, such as respect for the Labour Code, resolution of the debts of hospitals and higher salaries. But she noted that paying off the debts of the hospitals goes hand in hand with their transformation into joint-stock companies, which she said the trade unions keep rejecting for some reason.

 

“The bad management of the hospitals can be blamed on the fact that these work as budgetary organisations, lacking transparency and effectiveness,” Zollerová said, adding that hospitals that were transformed into staterun, joint-stock companies in 2006 are functioning with balanced budgets because they must maintain transparent accounting, publish their closing books and undergo audits

 

 

Source of the article here: http://spectator.sme.sk/articles/view/42646/3/doctors_threaten_mass_resignation.html