Posts Tagged ‘recruiting’

4 simple financial things that go a long way

Tuesday, February 16th, 2016

A bit of advice from our dear friends from Certinvest:

Another year has passed and you’re now planning your objectives for 2016: maybe you want to change the furniture in your house, or take a nice trip to Thailand, or just change your car with a more efficient one in terms of fuel consumption. None of these will become reality without proper money management.

Here’s how to do it:

DebtManagement2

  1. Manage your debt

If you don’t have debt up until now, congratulations! And make sure you don’t fall into it! However, debt at this time is not the worst, as interest rates are low, so the installments you’ll pay are quite affordable. But be advised that low interest rates will not remain low for long, so if you need to go into debt, make sure it’s for a short period, and that you truly need it.

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  1. Create a back-up fund

At some point, you will need money urgently: either your car breaks down, or you lose your job, or in happy cases, many of your friends will get married during the same summer. In all of these, you budget will be seriously affected, so be prepared. Save fist, spend later – that is the trick!

When you get your paycheck, put some money aside (about 10% of your salary), and then, go on with your life with the money you have left. You will see that changing your habits will make you more financially aware and prepared for an emergency situation.

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  1. Build a strong bank history

Even if you don’t consider it now, you will get a mortgage loan at some point. When you apply for a loan, the bank will check your credit history, so it’s better if you build it soundly in advance. What you need to do: make sure you pay all your bills or installments on time. It’s as simple as that. That way, your credit score will be clean, and when you will decide to apply for a loan, you will qualify with flying colors.

Prudent saving for retirement.

  1. Start saving for when you retire

You may think that being retired is a long way from here, and you’re probably right. But if you start to save money today for your future pension, you will need to set aside a lot less money than if you start to save for your pension a few years before you retire. Even 15 euro a month can do the trick. In 30 years, setting aside 15 euro a month, at an average 5% annual return will amount to more than 12 000 euro. Not too bad for a few coffees worth of money, right?

Building sound financial habits is key to building the life you want. Carefully planning your expenses, managing your debt and paying yourself first by saving will get you where you want to be financially.

 

Austria – and what living in Austria has to offer

Friday, February 5th, 2016

With an area of 83.858 sq. km Austria consists of 9 independent federal states (Burgenland, Carinthia, Lower Austria, Upper Austria, Salzburg, Styria, Tyrol, Vorarlberg and Vienna) with their own provincial governments. The federal legislation is exercised by the national council (Nationalrat) together with the Upper House of Parliament (Bundesrat) – the two chambers of Parliament.

Climate
 
Austria is located in a temperate climatic zone with a Central European climate influenced by the Atlantic climate. The four seasons (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) each have typical temperature and climatic characters.
In summer up to 35°C with an average of 29°C
In winter up to -20°C with an average of 0°C
Economy
Austria is the 11th richest country in the world in terms of GDP (Gross domestic product) per capita according to the IMF rankings of 2011, has a well-developed social market economy, and a high standard of living.
Vienna was ranked the fifth richest NUTS-2 region within Europe with GDP reaching € 38,632 per capita, just behind Inner London, Luxembourg, Brussels-Capital Region and Hamburg.
Red Bull is an energy drink sold by Austrian company Red Bull GmbH, created in 1987. In terms of market share, Red Bull is the most popular energy drink in the world, with 4.5 billion cans sold each year.
About one third of the Austria’s energy consumption is covered by the national energy industry. Up to 70% of the energy comes from renewable sources such as water. Austria’s industrial sector is, however, one of the world’s largest.
The services industry is Austria’s fastest growing industrial sector. About one sixth of Austria’s three million wage and salary workforce is employed in the trade and industry sector, which contributes some 13% to the GDP.
Tourism is the country’s biggest foreign exchange earner and the fastest growing sector: 220,000 people in 40,000 tourist establishments generate 10% of Austria’s economic output.
  
Healthcare
Austria has a high standard of compulsory state funded healthcare. Private healthcare is also available in the country. All employed citizens and their employers contribute to the system.
There are three areas of social insurance in Austria, health, accident, and pension insurance. Anyone who is covered by the state insurance system will be covered by at least one of these branches. The job you are employed in determines the amount you pay in contributions and the level of social insurance available to you.
Basic health and dental treatment, specialist consultations, stays in public hospitals and medication are covered for all employees. Family dependents are automatically covered through the insurance of the employed family member.
Culture
Coffeehouse culture in Austria
 
 Cafés are an everyday part of city living and in Vienna in particular they are at the heart of city life. Around 1900, a visit to a Viennese café was a spectacular experience, newspapers were displayed on custom-made stands, waiters wore tailcoats and ceilings were decorated with elaborate chandeliers.
Today’s coffeehouse business is booming as more and more people seek a place to rest, work, eat or socialize in busy cities.
Wiener Staatsoper
  
The Wiener Staatsoper is one of the busiest opera houses in the world producing 50 to 60 operas per year in approximately 200 performances. It is quite common to find a different opera being produced each day of a week. As such, the Staatsoper employs over 1000 people.
Art
Gustav Klimt was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Secession movement. Some of the most known paintings are The Kiss, Judith and the Head of Holofernes and Adele Bloch-Bauer I.
  
Friedensreich Regentag Dunkelbunt Hundertwasser was an Austrian artist. Born Friedrich Stowasser in Vienna, he became one of the best-known contemporary Austrian artists, although controversial, by the end of the 20th century. Some of his work include The Hundertwasserhaus apartment block in Vienna and Bad Blumau – a municipality and spa town in the district of Fürstenfeld in Styria, Austria.
  
Egon Schiele was an Austrian painter. A protégé of Gustav Klimt, Schiele was a major figurative painter of the early 20th century. The twisted body shapes and the expressive line that characterize Schiele’s paintings and drawings mark the artist as an early exponent of Expressionism. His work includes Zwei Kleine Mädchen, Portrait of Wally and House with Shingles.
Music
Austria has been the birthplace of many famous composers such as Joseph Haydn, Franz Liszt, Franz Schubert, Anton Bruckner, Johann Strauss, Sr. and Johann Strauss, Jr. and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
 
 
Literature
Some scholars speak about Austrian literature in a strict sense from the year 1806 on when Francis II disbanded the Holy Roman Empire and established the Austrian Empire. A more liberal definition incorporates all the literary works written on the territory of todays and historical Austria, especially when it comes to authors who wrote in German. Thus, the seven volume history of Austrian literature by the editors Herbert Zeman and Fritz Peter Knapp is titled History of the Literature in Austria.
 
 
René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke better known as Rainer Maria Rilke was a Bohemian-Austrian poet. He is considered one of the most significant poets in the German language.
His two most famous prose works are the Letters to a Young Poet and the semi-autobiographical Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge.
Stefan Zweig was an Austrian novelist, playwright, journalist and biographer. At the height of his literary career, in the 1920s and 1930s, he was one of the most famous writers in the world.
Zweig is best known for his novellas The Royal Game, Amok, Letter from an Unknown Woman – filmed in 1948 by Max Ophuls
Franz Kafka was an influential German-language author of novels and short stories. One of his most famous novellas is The Metamorphosis.
Robert Hamerling was an Austrian poet. He was born into a poor family at Kirchberg am Walde in Lower Austria. Hamerling displayed an early genius for poetry.
His most important works are his epic poems: Ahasuerus in Rome and The King of Zion.
Cuisine
  
Vienna boasts one of the world’s most famous culinary traditions. A diverse yet delectably harmonious range of dishes reflects the city’s mix of nationalities and food cultures through the centuries, and inspires visitors from all over the world.
Sports
Due to the mountainous terrain, alpine skiing is a prominent sport in Austria. Similar sports such as snowboarding and ski jumping are also widely popular, and Austrian athletes such as Annemarie Moser-Pröll, Hermann Maier, and Toni Sailer are widely regarded as some of the greatest alpine skiers of all time.
The Austrian Football League (AFL) is the elite league of American football in Austria. The league was founded in 1984 and plays by the rules of the NCAA.
Andreas Nikolaus “Niki” Lauda is an Austrian former Formula One racing driver and three-time F1 World Champion.
Cost of living
Food:
  • A meal at an inexpensive restaurant: 8.16 €
  • A three-course meal for two at a mid-ranged restaurant: 37.18 €
  • 1 Liter of milk: 0.95 €
  • 1 kilogram of chicken breasts: 8.42 €
  • 1 kilogram of oranges: 1.77 €
  • 1 kilogram of potatoes: 1.10 €
Transport:
  • A monthly pass for the local transport system: 43.93 €
  • 1 km with a taxi with normal tariff: 1.48 €
  • 1 liter of gasoline: 1.40 €
Utilities:
  • Monthly utilities for an 85m² Apartment: 155.27 €
  • 1 minute of pre-paid mobile tariff: 0.11 €
  • Internet access (6Mbps, Flat Rate, Cable/ADSL): 18.38 €
Leisure:
  • The monthly fee for an adult at a fitness center: 48.85 €
  • 1 hour tennis court rent in the weekend: 16.30 €
  • 1 seat in the cinema for an international release: 8.40 €
Rent:
  • Rent for a 1 bedroom apartment starts from 350 €
  • Rent for a 3 bedroom apartment starts from 700 €
The rent varies from one federal state and city to another. Still, there can be more attractive offers for Doctors. 
Taxation
Austria’s individual income tax rates are progressive 0%-50% (4 tax bands).
Beside the 12 salaries there are also salaries 13 and 14 which are taxed with only 6% – this is typical in Austria. The 6% lead to a very small difference between the gross salary and the net salary.

 

Income Euro Tax (%)
1 – 11,000 0
11,001 – 25,000 36,6
25,001 – 60,000 43.21
60,001 and over 50

Thuringen and its offer – Or what one can do and expect when living in Thuringen!

Sunday, July 6th, 2014

The free state of Thüringen is located in the central part of Germany. From the northwest going clockwise, Thüringen has borders with the states of Lower Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt, Sachsen, Bayern and Hessen. Thüringen is the sixth smallest by area and the fifth smallest by population of Germany´s sixteen states. Its capital city is Erfurt.


Erfurt cathedral and Severikirche


Erfurt Town Hall

Thüringen has been known by the nickname of ´´the green heart of Germany´´, from the late 19th century, due to the dense forest that covers the terrain. The ridges of the western Harz Mountains divide the region from Lower Sachsen on the north-west, while the eastern Harz similarly separates Thüringen from the state of Sachsen-Anhalt to the north-east. To the south and southwest, the Thüringen Forest effectively separates the ancient region of Franconia, now the northern part of Bavaria, from the rolling plains of most of Thüringen. The central Harz range extends southwards along the western side into the northwest corner of the Thüringen Forest region, Making Thüringen a lowland basin of rolling plains nearly surrounded by ancient somewhat-difficult mountains. To the west across the mountains and south is the drainage basin on the Rhine River.


Thüringen forest north of Schweinfurt

After the capital city of Erfurt, important urban districts are Eisenach, Gera, Jena, Suhl and Weimar.

 
Eisenach Nikolai Chuch, Luther House

 

 
Gera, view from above and Town hall

 


Jena

 


Suhl from above

 

 
Grand-Ducal Palace Weimar, Goethe Schiller monument Weimar

 Culture:

 Culture is thicker on the ground in Thüringen than in any other state in Germany. Castles, palaces, gardens and historical monasteries can be found dotting the landscape throughout the state. Thüringen boasts over 30,000 architectural and art monuments as well as 3000 archeological sites. Culture has shaped both the region´s heritage and its contemporary identity.

Belvedere Castle Weimar

Wartburg Castle
 
Bibra Castle, Ehrenburg Castle 
Classicism is at home in Thüringen. In a one-of-a-kind ensemble, the Klassik Stiftung Weimar unites museums of art and literature, the historic homes of literary luminaries and royal palaces and gardens.
This is where the legacy of Goethe and Schiller is kept alive. The spectrum covered by the collections, which have been pieced together over more than 400 years, is unequalled anywhere in the world. Among the most important institutions are the Goethe National Museum, Schiller´s Home, the Widow´s Palace, the Duchess Anna Amalia Library, the Goethe and Schiller Archive, the Nietzsche Archive and the Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt.
 
Goethe National Museum Weimar

The Widow´s Palace

Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt
As a land of culture, Thüringen also possesses a museum landscape that has evolved over time and continues to grow, with a number of new additions in recent years. In a total of 180 museums, art and cultural treasures of international, national and regional significance are collected, researched and exhibited. The Buchenwald and Mittelbau-Dora Memorials Foundation, by contrast, is dedicated to the task of preserving the two concentration camp sites as places of mourning and commemoration, as well as documenting and researching the historical background behind the crimes committed there.

Buchenwald concentration camp entrance
One glance at the map shows that Thüringen has more theaters and orchestras per square kilometer than any other territorial state in Germany. This cultural diversity is nurtured and maintained.
 
Theater Gera and Altenburg


Theater interior Altenburg

Thüringen has also made a name for itself over the past several years with its annual musical festivals: in summer the TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival attracts crowds of music-lovers. Other cultural high points during the year are the Kulturarena in Jena, the Kunstfest in Weimar, the Thüringen Bach Festival and the Thüringen Summer Organ Festival.

TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival
Cuisine:
Cooking in the German state of Thüringen is molded by its wide range of fruit and vegetable production, as well as its large forest. Meals in Thüringen are very healthy, consisting often of large portions of meat with rich sauces. Wurst and wild game are among the region´s specialties.
Cakes also play an important role in Thüringen´s culinary traditions. They are found at every breakfast table, they are central to every coffee break and they are even offered to party guests as a midnight snack. However, unlike other regions in Germany, Thüringen mainly offers sheet cakes (Blechkuchen).
  
Rinderrouladen, Thüringer Klöße, Blechkuchen
Economy:
In the area between the Harz Mountains and the Thüringen Forest, agriculture has long played a very important role. In addition, major industrial centers shape the economic realm in this state.
Thüringen made a good job of getting to grips with the upheavals and structure change in the wake of the fall of the Wall. Manufacturing industry is the key sector driving growth, with a whole host of different branches represented. These include more traditional areas, such as optics, glass mining, wood/timber, metal products and the automobile industry, as well as branches, such as the plastic industry, solar energy and medical technology. The food processing industry is also developing into a significant economic factor for Thüringen.
One of the world renowned optics manufacturers, Carl Zeiss AG, has subsidies in Jena. Carl Zeiss is one of the oldest existing optics manufacturers in the world. Now over 150 years old, Zeiss continues to be associated with expensive and high-quality optical lenses. Zeiss lenses are generally thought to be elegant and well-constructed, yielding high-quality images.
Zeiss and its subsidiaries offer a wide range of products related to optics and vision. These include camera and cine lenses, microscopes and microscopy software, binoculars and spotting scopes, eyeglasses and lenses, planetariums and dome video-systems, optics for military applications (head tracker systems, submarine periscopes, targeting systems), optical sensors, industrial metrology systems and ophthalmology products.


Carl Zeiss AG. Jena 1910

  

 

Saxony and Thüringen are the strongest eastern German federal states. The regional GDP in 2008 was €49.8b. Between 1995 and 2006, the Thüringen GDP/inhabitant evolved from €14,502.6 to €19,782.1.

Tourism:

 A wide range of landscapes, a remarkable number of castles and palaces, extraordinary architectural and cultural diversity and a great range of leisure activities – that is the holiday region of Thüringen. Goethe summed up Thüringen´s merits in his inimitable style: “Where else in Germany can you find so many wonderful things in such close proximity?“
Erfurt, Weimar and other towns in Thüringen offer visitors an engaging mix of history and tradition, culture and leisure activities, the classical and the modern. In Weimar, the 1999 European City of Culture, there´s hardly anywhere that doesn´t in some way reflect the town´s rich heritage.
For many years, visitors from around the world have flocked to the statue of Goethe and Schiller in front of the German National Theater and to a total of 27 museums. The UNESCO World Heritage site ´Classical Weimar´ comprises 16 individual buildings.
But towns such as Erfurt, Jena, Eisenach, Altenberg, Meiningen and Gotha also offer plenty of cultural highlights. Erfurt is blessed with a wealth of attractions, including St. Mary´s Cathedral and the Church of St. Severus on Domplatz square, the Merchants´ Bridge and the long-established ega horticultural exhibition. Art and culture in Thüringen is closely linked to the work of representatives of Germany´s cultural and intellectual tradition. Museums, theaters, exhibitions and concert halls display the legacies of the writers Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller, the composer Johann Sebastian Bach ant the painters Lucas Cranach and Otto Dix.
Thüringen´s best known castle and the most famous landmark of the town of Eisenach is Wartburg Castle, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999. Besides Wartburg Castle, Friedenstein Palace in Gotha and the Dornburg palaces attract lots of tourists.
 
Friedenstein Palace in Gotha
 Dornburg Palace

What does it mean to be a doctor in the field of Psychosomatic Medicine?

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

 

 

Being a healthcare recruiting agency with a lot of vacant positions in the field of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy in Germany we are often asked by our candidates:

  • “Is this specialty similar to other specialties in other countries?”
  • “What does a doctor do if he chooses to start his residency program in the field of Psychosomatic?”
  •  “Why should I be interested in following this specialty?”

The field of psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy is a relative new specialization that was established in Germany in 1992 after realising the need for such medical specialists. Currently the field is only present in Germany and Austria.

The residency program covers:

  • 3 years of psychosomatic and psychotherapy
  • 1 year of psychiatry
  • 1 year of internal medicine

Psychosomatic medicine includes:

  • Diagnosis of psychosomatic illnesses
  • Psychotherapeutic treatment
  • Prevention and rehabilitation

In order to become a specialist doctor in the field of Psychosomatic Medicine, one must complete the 5 years of residency. At least 1500 hours of psychotherapeutic treatment must be provided by the physician in training with respective minimum numbers for individual psychotherapies of different lengths (short-term therapy, shoulder length therapies, long-term therapy), group therapy, couple and family therapy.

Specialist training for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy includes:

  • ethical, scientific and legal foundations of medical practice
  • the medical evaluation
  • the measures of quality assurance and quality management, including the error and risk management
  • medical interviewing, including family counselling
  • psychosomatic Basics
  • interdisciplinary collaboration
  • the etiology, pathophysiology and pathogenesis of diseases
  • the Enlightenment and the documentation of findings
  • the laboratory-based detection methods
  • medical emergency situations
  • the principles of pharmacotherapy, including the interactions of drugs and drug abuse
  • the general pain management
  • the care of seriously ill and dying
  • interdisciplinary indications for further diagnostic tests-including the differential indication and interpretation of radiological findings related to territorial issues
  • psychosocial, environmental and cross-cultural influences on health
  • the prevention, detection, treatment and rehabilitation psychotherapeutic psychosomatic diseases and disorders including family counseling, addiction and suicide prevention
  • the practical application of scientifically recognized psychotherapy procedures and methods, especially cognitive behavioral therapy or psychodynamic psychotherapy
  • the indication for socio-therapeutic measures
  • Detection and treatment of behavioral problems in childhood and adolescence
  • Basics of detection and treatment of internal diseases that require a psychosomatic treatment
  • Detection and treatment of mental-physical interactions in chronic diseases, such as cancer, neurological, cardiac, orthopedic and rheumatic diseases as well as metabolic and autoimmune diseases
  • psychiatric history and diagnostic assessment
  • the area-based drug therapy, with particular reference to the risks of drug abuse
  • the detection and psychotherapeutic treatment of psychogenic pain syndromes
  • autogenic training or progressive muscle relaxation or hypnosis
  • the implementation of supportive and psycho-educational therapies for somatic health
  • Foundations in behavioral therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy
  • Crisis interventions under supervision
  • 35 double hours Balint group or interaction-related casework
  • psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic consulting and liaison service

 

Why should you consider becoming a specialist doctor in the field of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy?

Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy is an exciting and new growing medical speciality with a fast and constant evolution. It offers a new point of view regarding the correlation between physical and (somatic) illness and psychiatric factors that create somatic illnesses without physical substance.

An interesting aspect is the fact that a Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy practitioner has the opportunity to conduct psychiatric evaluations and treatments for mentally healthy individuals without having to interact with common psychiatric patients.

One can be certain that Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy practitioners will be more and more sought after in the near future!

Interested in working in the field of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy?

Check out this job description!

 

 

 

 

Denmark’s idyllic countryside

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Well-known for its cosmopolitan capital, cutting edge contemporary design and the timeless fairytales of Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark’s stunning coastlines and rolling countryside must be equally revered.

With mile upon mile of pristine coastline complemented by an unspoiled interior of forests, heaths and rolling farmland, the Danes love nothing more than getting out into the heart of their beautiful countryside. Visitors can also easily follow suit by making a leisurely exploration along one of the many designated, long-distance touring trails – ideal for exploring on foot, by bike or on an unhurried drive along picturesque country lanes.

Spoiled for choice when it comes to touring itineraries, visitors looking to travel under their own steam, for example, can walk or cycle sections of the Hærvej, or ‘Army Way’, which traces what was for centuries the main transportation route through the Jutland peninsular. Linking a whole network of paths, it forms a 250km trail along the backbone of the country, from the town of Viborg in north-central Jutland all the way south to the German border and beyond. With well-maintained walking and cycling trails established along this historic route, it follows a ridge that affords some of the most spectacular views in Denmark.

Dotted with interesting sights – including breathtaking natural scenery, historic fortifications, ancient burial mounds and plenty of Viking history – visitors can put their best foot forward discovering these at their own pace. Marking a start to the Hærvej, the imposing Viborg Cathedral, one of the largest granite churches in northern Europe whose two towers dominate the skyline, is a definite highlight. From here, the path continues south across the wild, open heaths of Kongenshus Hede and on through the outstanding natural beauty of Egtved, known for its windmills, watermills and Bronze Age relics from the grave of the Egtved Girl – which include some incredibly well-preserved burial objects dating from around 1370BC. Another unmissable historic attraction is Jelling, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s home to a huge, ship-shaped stone circle that was created in the 10th Century by the Viking Kings Gorm the Old and Harold Bluetooth. More recent history can be found at the Frøslev Camp Museum, a well-preserved World War II prison camp that once interred political prisoners and members of the Danish Resistance. There are also a good number of interesting detours to be made from the Hærvej, such as a visit to the sources of Denmark’s longest (the GudenÃ¥) and its largest (SkjernÃ¥) rivers, which rise just a few hundred metres apart but then flow in opposite directions towards the east and west coasts respectively, creating their own attractions.

Runic stones in Jelling Denmark

Visitors preferring a less energetic means of travel can instead opt for one of the driving tours such as the Margueritruten, a scenic route that passes through spectacular countryside on its way past more than 200 of Denmark’s most popular attractions. Marked by characteristic marguerite (daisy) road-signs, this winding 3,600km route takes in the cities of Copenhagen, Odense and Aalborg as it wends its way through Zealand, Funen and on through central and northern Jutland, exploring some of the country’s most remote corners. Cleverly following an extremely well-planned network of roads, the trail ensures drivers never see the same view twice. Although designated as a driving route, following such quiet roads makes it equally well suited to touring by bike.

The Marguerite Route also takes full advantage of Denmark’s stunning coastline passing along the west coast and providing visitors with an opportunity to discover the Wadden Sea, one of Denmark’s most ecologically important areas. Depending on the time of year, visitors to this vast intertidal area can encounter some incredible wildlife spectacles. In the spring and autumn, the mudflats provide an important stopover site over ten million migrating shorebirds, which pause on the food-rich alluvium to refuel before continuing their epic journeys. The transitional months are also the time to witness the phenomenon of the Black Sun, when huge flocks of starlings swirl across the dusk sky with their amazing aerobatic displays presenting a truly mesmerising sight. In summer, seal safaris operate from Esbjerg Harbour, with sightings of spotted seals being virtually guaranteed. Then from October to April, guided walks across the tidal flats give visitors the chance to forage for fresh oysters, which can be harvested in large numbers all across the area.

Another interesting spot along the West Jutland coast is Ringkøbing Fjord, an area of outstanding natural beauty that’s known in particular for its watersports. Windsurfers are especially well catered for here, but there are also plenty of opportunities for other activities like canoeing, angling or simply taking a refreshing dip. Nearby Nymindegab Kro offers an interesting place to stay; this traditional Danish inn is perched high on the dunes overlooking the North Sea and is the perfect place for exploring the surrounds or tucking into delicious local dishes. Further north, the route passes through Thy National Park, allowing visitors a chance to discover nature in the raw in this extensive area of dunes, forests and heaths including the wetland reserve of Vejlerne – the largest bird sanctuary in northern Europe and home to all kinds of rare and unusual flora and fauna.

Away from the coast, other highlights along the Marguerite Route include the fairytale forest of Rold Skov. At 80 km², this is Denmark’s largest forest and home to ancient trees, crystal-clear lakes and rare wild orchids. More natural beauty can be found at Rebild Bakker, a famously picturesque area of woods, gorges and valleys,  and Mols Bjerge National Park, which occupies an area of rolling hills and wildflower-rich meadows on the Djursland peninsula. Closer to Aalborg, Denmark’s third largest city, lies Lindholm Høje, home to Scandinavia’s largest Viking burial ground with more than 700 well-preserved graves. Also of historical interest is Koldinghus Castle, Jutland’s oldest royal castle and home to an extensive art collection. Another interesting place to visit is the pretty town of Vejle, which is so well-loved by the Danes that it’s been labelled ‘Denmark’s cosiest town’. Just outside Vejle lies the recently-created Kongens Kær wetland park, complete with nature trails and picnic areas – another perfect place for visitors to pause on their journey and reflect on the pleasures of day touring, Danish-style.

Whether walking, riding or driving, Denmark’s numerous touring routes and trails offer the perfect path to a relaxing holiday.

We at EGV Recruiting currently have positions available for doctors willing to work in Denmark! Check out our offer here:

http://www.mejobs.eu/en/ofertedk.html

 

 

Source of the article here: http://www.visitdenmark.co.uk/

Weird stepstones into modern medicine

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Browsing trough the internet we stubled upon an interesting blog posting interesting and disturbing pictures of early medical devices, strange medical conduct (according to today’s standards) and things that for today’s doctors would just seem weird and creepy.

Brain hemorrhage, post-mortem

Corset damage to a ribcage. 19th century London

Dr. Kilmer’s Female Remedy

 

Tanning babies at the Chicago Orphan Asylum, 1925, to offset winter rickets

Woman with an artificial leg, too embarrassed to show her face c. 1890 – 1900

Wooden prosthetic hand, c. 1800

Selection of some items used to disguise facial injuries. Early plastic surgery.

Blood transfusion bottle, England 1978

Dr. Clark’s Spinal Apparatus advertisement, 1878

Neurological exam with electrical device, c. 1884

Antique prosthetic leg

US Civil War surgeon’s kit

“Walter Reed physiotherapy store” 1920’s

Boy in rolling “invalid cart” c. 1915

Obstetric phantom, Italy 1700-1800. Tool to teach medical students and midwives about childbirth

Radioactive yummies

Lewis Sayre’s scoliosis treatment

Claude Beck’s early defibulator

Antique birthing chair used until the 1800s

Anatomical Model. Doctors were not allowed to touch the women’s bodies, so they would point to describe pain locations

Radiology nurse technician, WWI France 1918

1855 – 1860. One of first surgical procedures using ether as an anesthetic

Masks worn by doctors during the Plague. The beaks held scented substances

 

Regardless, these pictures represent evolution. Who knows, maybe in 100 years, people looking at pictures from today’s medical conduct will react the same as we do to these pictures. What do you think?

 

Source of the article here: http://imgur.com/a/QagTz 

 

The German experience of a young Romanian Surgeon

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Once Romania entered the European Union in 2007, significant advantages for the highly skilled and educated were created with the liberalization of the labor-market.

Gabriel B. lives in Germany since 2007, and is currently in the 5th residency year as a General Surgeon. After graduating medicine in 2007, Gabriel moved to Nordrhein-Westfalen in a city with about 25 000 inhabitants in order to start his medical career.

The hospital in which Gabriel is currently working, benefits of 150 beds for inpatient care and 59 beds for the surgical department. Offering high quality diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with comprehensive and modern medical equipment, combining high tech medical care with humanity and personal attention is a high priority of the hospital. The hospital benefits from:

  • CT scanner
  • Ultrasound devices
  • High quality video and X-ray systems
  • Zeus and Cicero devices

“Starting off in a smaller city and a smaller hospital is ideal for foreign doctors. Accommodation with the system and integration in the medical team is the key factor and one of the hospitals focal points when it comes to foreign doctors. Colleagues are patient and helpful, soon I felt like part of the team”, stated Gabriel.

“Social integration is also not an issue. Living in a smaller city, and working with people for people, especially in the respected field of medicine grants you rapid recognition. People greet me on the street, so we get to know each other resulting to mutual respect and of course friendship.

But, of course social integration does not only mean receiving recognition, it also means sharing interests. For example Germans value their gardens, spending a decent amount of their time gardening and making their front and back gardens esthetic. Of course they also love their home, their cars, their sports and to travel,” added Gabriel.

“The home environment is another plus. I enjoy getting to live in a two story house with a beautiful front and back garden in a nice and peaceful neighborhood. I don’t live by myself in the whole house, I have upstairs neighbors but its ok we don’t bother one another, the house has different entrances so we don’t have to bump into one another unless we want to”, stated Gabriel.

A common misconception is created when it comes to thinking about smaller cities. People think that smaller cities bring no opportunities for leisure and entertainment, schools and employment for the rest of the family.

“I can honestly say that in a radius of 20km you can find everything! Pharmacies, schools, kindergartens, cinemas, theaters, malls, stores like H&M or Zara, restaurants ranging from Chinese, Italian and Turkish to restaurants with traditional German food, and of course McDonalds and Burger King.

Sports and other outdoors leisure activities are also easily accessible. Tennis courts, football fields, swimming-pools and indoor swimming pools are close by. Spas and Gyms are easily accessible. Besides all the above, Nordic walks, hiking and biking are sought after activities here in Germany”, stated Gabriel.

Getting from A to B

“One of the most important things about Germany is its infrastructure. Airports, highways, freeways, bike lanes, public transport… they all seem to eat up the distance between different cities, counties and even different countries. No wonder the Germans love to travel!” stated Gabriel.

“I can honestly say I’m proud to make part of the community in the city I live and work in”, Gabriel B.

Celebrating our candidates success stories

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

“A thing of great importance to us is learning from your experience, learning from your success, thus perfecting ourselves in the future”

In life, one should always find time to celebrate success and give credit to the success of others. Every year we like to dedicate an evening to all of our successful candidates that are happily living and working in Germany, and that have remained thankful for all of our hard work and time that we invested in helping them reach their goal: Starting a better life in Germany.

For the celebrations of 2012, the location for the meeting played a key role creating the perfect atmosphere. The city of Weilburg has an historical significance that spread out for over a millennia, giving tourists and visitors the ability to experience to travel back in time and wander through its old squares, castle gardens and narrow medieval streets, and of course – Castle Weilburg.

Dining in the shadow of Weilburg Castle:

As ripped out of a fairytale, a medieval setting, bright lighted hall with tasteful decorations, red velvet seats and big round dining tables and of course, music in the background.

As the guests started arriving, cheerful greets and laughter started to fill the room, transforming the formal setting into a more family-like environment. Every guest is greeted with a glass of champagne, an honest thank you for joining our event and a smile that illustrates the true satisfaction of seeing former candidates so well and truly happy with their new found life in Germany.

“Tonight cultural and ethnic backgrounds do not matter, we are all Europeans!” 

It was so nice to see the fact that cultural backgrounds didn’t matter. Doctors in Germany are doctors in Germany, and they loved to share their experience with one another and exchange experiences about medical and non-medical related topics.

Once everybody got acquainted with each other and the champagne glasses where empty, a short toast was held:

“It is my great pleasure to see you all here at our yearly event. I am so happy to see that you are all well and that you and your families have adapted to the German way of life so well over the years. A thing of great importance to us is learning from your experience, learning from your success, thus perfecting ourselves and our services in the future. But first, let’s honor the mission of our cooks that prepared tonight’s meal for us. Thank you again for coming! Bon Appetite!”

The food was great, the service was impeccable, and the atmosphere was of joy and laughter. As soon as the deserts were finished it was time to honor our own mission and learn about our doctor’s success.

Everybody was keen to share their own personal experiences with us, experiences involving everything from the profession and workplace to the personal life and comparisons between living in Germany and life back home.

First of all, I have to underline the fact that no one was thinking of leaving Germany in the future and going back home, thus denoting a change for the better.

“Integration at the workplace and in society is relatively easy achieved. At the workplace, the multicultural aspects play a key role, German doctors and patients are used to having foreign doctors and foreign colleagues, as long as you can speak German and as long as you prove yourself as a professional people will treat you with respect.” 

“Integration in the German society is also helped by the facts that in Germany doctors are respected, especially in smaller cities where people get to know you. Of course the financial aspect helps the integration process as well. It’s nice to know that you can afford to go out and eat at a restaurant whenever you want, or go to the cinema or the theater.”

“Back home if we wanted to plan a vacation, we had to start putting money aside for months in a row just to be able to afford it; here you can have a decent vacation with the whole family out of just one paycheck.”

“The way of life is far more relaxed and far more comfortable than it was back home. Actually the whole quality of life is much better here, from the professional to the private aspects of life, it is a dream come true to be able to use high tech equipment in the hospital with no restrictions, to be able to prescribe any medications because they are all available in the hospital and to be able to go relaxed home knowing that you can easily pay your bills have fun, go to the restaurant, to the theater, to the cinema, or to go on vacation and still be able to put money aside in your bank account.”

“Starting off in a smaller hospital in a smaller city was the best decision I could have ever taken. As a foreigner having to adapt to so many aspects and break so many barriers at the beginning having a peaceful and calm home and work environment was all I needed. It is hard at first to get used to the system and the culture and the country… having great colleagues that were eager to help me adapt made my life a whole lot easier.”

“Another great thing is the learning experience here as a doctor. Hospitals put a huge accent on learning and training. The residency here as opposed to back home is not only a theoretical learning curve, everybody gets the chance to practice what they learn thus making us responsible doctors.”

As a plus, Dr. Cristian Baluta, resident doctor for Neurology, offerd us the chance to take a short interview with him, interview in which he describes his own experience as a young foreign doctor in Germany. You can access the interview here:

Besides sharing personal and professional experiences with us, it was nice to see that over the years we managed to create a tightly knit community of doctors with foreign backgrounds that thanks to our annual meetings have gotten to know each other and become friends.

We can only conclude that our annual doctor meeting of 2012 was a success. It was a pleasure for us to help you find a position in Germany and now, it is an honor for us to get to learn from your personal success and experience! Thank you!

“From our first contact with EGV Recruiting, we knew that we were dealing with a serious firm. We will forever be thankful to the people that helped us start a better life here in Germany”

German hospitals interested in Czech doctors

Friday, November 16th, 2012

German hospitals atract more and more czech doctors offering them hundreds of positions. The salary of doctor in Germany is 4 times higher that in the Czech Republic, but this is not the sole reason that makes Germany so attractive, equippment and professional growth opportunities also tip the ballance in Germany’s favor.

A young doctor in Germany earns about 3800 Euro’s /month while in the Czech republic the starting salary for a young doctor is 1000 Euros.

Last year, 172 med school graduates applyed for work abroad. After the first half of this year almost 100 doctors applied, having Germany the main destination point.

 

Source of the article: Slovenský rozhlas (12.11.2012 ,posted by Boris Kršňák, Prague)

Choosing a German State

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Recently, we held a short survey designed to better understand our candidates’ wishes and desires when it comes to moving abroad and starting a career as a foreign doctor in a foreign land.
The survey was relatively simple with just two separate questions.

  1. In which country would you rather see yourself working as a doctor?
  2. In which German state would you like to live and work as a doctor?

Although some candidates prefer different countries or areas, some not even in Europe most of them seem to be interested in Germany.

Although Germany is the most sought after destination, it has its own “hot spots”, such as the land Bayern.

This outcome can just raises the following question: “Why?”.

All German states have state of the art hospitals, all German states have great infrastructure, and some German states have even an easier dialect than Boarisch (the German dialect spoken in Bayern).

Of course some of you may have friends or family in some states and that would justify your decision when picking a specific region.
For some people of course the distance from their homeland plays a key role, so here is something you might not know.

As in antiquity all roads led to Rome, for the East-West medical highway all roads lead to Vienna, thus we invite you to take a closer look to the maps below and pinpoint the distance form your country and hometown to any German state and city.

 

The first map represents the map of Europe and all circles have Vienna as an epicenter. 

The second map is a close-up of the first map with focus on Germany so that you can see all German cities and states in the 300km, 450km, 600km, 750km and 900km distance radius of Vienna:

  • 300km radius: 
    Part of Bayern, including cities such as Passau, Deggendorf, Bad Füssing.
  • 300-450km radius:
    Part of Bayern, including cities such as München, Augsburg, Ingolstadt, Regensburg, Nürnberg, Erlangen.
    Part of Thüringen, including cities such as Grea.
    Most of Sachsen, including cities such as Zwickau, Plauen, Chemnitz, Dresden, Leipzig, Radeberg, Görlitz.
    Part of the state Brandenburg, including cities such as Cottbus, Lüben.
  • 450-600km radius:
    Most of Baden-Württemberg, including cities such as Albstadt, Ulm, Stuttgart, Karlsruhe, Pforzheim, Heidelberg.
    Part of Bayern, including cities such as Würzburg and Schweinfurt.
    Part of Hessen, including cities such as Darmstadt, Frankfurt am Main, Kassel, Schlitz, Fulda.
    Part of Thüringen including cities such as Erfurt, Suhl, Weimar, Mühlhausen.
    Part of Niedersachsen, including cities such as Göttingen, Brunswick.
    Sachsen Anhalt, with cities such as Halle, Dessau, Magdeburg, Stendal.
    Part of Brandenburg, with cities such as Potsdam, Rathenow, Neuruppin, Schwedt.
    Berlin
    Part of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, with cities such as Neustrelitz.
  • 600-750km radius:
    Part of Baden-Württemberg, with cities such as Freiburg.
    Saarland, with cities such as Saarbrucken.
    Rheinland-Pfalz, with cities such as Kaiserlautern, Worms, Trier, Koblenz.
    Part of Hessen, including cities such as Wiesbaden, Wetzlar.
    Part of Nordrhein-Westfalen, including Bonn, Köln, Siegen, Remschied, Dortmund, Münster, Bielfeld.
    Part of Nidersachsen, icluding cities such as Hanover, Celle, Verden, Soltau, Uelzen, Lüneburg.
    Bremen.
    Hamburg.
    Part of Schleswig-Holstein, with cities such as Ahrensburg, Lübeck.
    Part of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, with cities such as Schwerin, Rostock, Greifswald, Stralsund, Barth, Bergen.
  • 750-900km radius:
    Part of Nordrhein-Westfalen, with cities such as Düsseldorf, Duisburg, Essen.
    Part of Niedersachsen, with cities such as Osnabruck, Oldenburg, Lingen, Cuxhaven.
    Part of Schleswig-Holstein, with cities such as Kiel, Schleswig, Flensburg.

 

We would be more than delighted if you would tell us your preferences regarding working as a doctor in Germany!

EGV Recruiting