Posts Tagged ‘EGV Recruiting’

Why we need Wikipedia and why Wikipedia needs us

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

 

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Crowd-sourcing is the backbone of Wikipedia, and of the utopian new world of the internet. Via Flickr

As we move through life we gain an understanding of what we want our contribution to the world to be. Some try to leave an ‘I WAS HERE’ that can be seen from outer space, and some are happy to contribute their part to the project of humanity in a more quiet manner. As doctors, the instinct to contribute is hardwired in the work we do, or else, we wouldn’t have chosen this profession.

The story of Wikipedia is the story of a silent, incremental victory, constructed at the hands of millions of such contributors. And the end result is set to be the stuff of science fiction: a continuously updating database of all human knowledge, accessible at any time, even (and especially) through your phone.

The often dodgy reputation of Wikipedia is based on its crowd-sourced structure. That means anybody can edit the posts and as the reasoning goes, ‘anybody’ is an untrustworthy individual. The reality is that the accuracy of the site has been tested against the cream of the crop of reference sources, the “Encyclopedia Britannica” and has been shown to be just as accurate, or sometimes more so. The more people contribute to and edit an article, the more the accuracy improves, while sources like the Britannica are static. Adding to that, I highly doubt that you will find any entry about the buttered cat paradox in any hard-copy encyclopedia.

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Information is power, and states like China are doing their best (and worst) to silence it. Via Cox & Forkum

Be honest, how many times have you looked up medical information in wikipedia? We thought so. It is easy to dismiss Wikipedia as just a treasure trove for lazy high schoolers or as the last word in solving an argument among friends about the origin of some type of sausage. The reality is, in many places where information is an expensive commodity, it is much more than that. Wikipedia is on the edge of a revolution in education and is working alongside innovators such as Bill Gates to provide access to education in places where it is needed most, like sub-saharan Africa or India.

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Your contribution could break the cycle of poverty for so many children, through the gift of education. Via Kmende

An incredible number of success stories stand testament to the fact that the site is a major source for people in disadvantaged countries. An example is Akshaya Iyengar, a girl from a poor town in India that used Wikipedia to fuel her transformation from underprivileged child to software engineer in the U.S. She is just one of thousands, soon to be millions. Another strongtestament to the value of its contributions is the constant censorship that plagues the site in states like China and Iran. In a context where information is power, the mere availability of it is almost subversive to authoritarian governments and acts as an important platform for dissidents, activists and especially for people that don’t have access to information and just want to learn.

In recent years, Wikipedia has started a donation drive to expand its hardware, update its software and strategy and keep the site free of intrusive advertising. Raising money any other way is a complicated affair for a company that can’t offer investors any scaleable monetisation and is, in practice, a charity for information. While many people find the donation drive aggressive it is mainly because we have gotten used to the comfortable luxury of having this vast portal into knowledge open, for free. The truth is that the infrastructure of the seventh most visited site on the internet can’t be managed for pennies out of somebody’s garage. If we want to be part of the grandiose project of cataloging the expanse of knowledge, we can start by either contributing expertise or by contributing cash. Both add their significant part to the goal of spreading valuable knowledge.

As an organisation we are proud to donate to Wikipedia, because we deal in intelligence. The doctors and organisations we help are the product of their cumulated minds and experience. There is no other charity that is so directly valuable for so many of us and we strongly urge you to do your, even if small, part to expand Wikipedia’s web of wisdom and aid its many incredibly valuable projects.

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All roads lead to Russian ballet if you have a free afternoon and internet access. Via Flickr

Even though the site has been through its share of criticism for asking us directly for cash, the value it creates is undeniable any time you get sucked into its information hole and end up researching Russian ballet when all you wanted was to find out about how they make blue cheese. That is the miracle of creating relevant, updated and interesting information at the click of a button. The fact is, the world we live in is built on the supremacy of information and Wikipedia is, at the moment, humanity’s best shot at getting all that information cataloged, organized and accessible.

What if we told you that with the price of one coffee you could contribute a small but essential part to the project of universal access to knowledge? You may not feel the ripples of this small gesture just yet, but the expected return is enormous: access to the vastness of universal education for everyone, especially those that need it most.

Contribute now! 

 

By Alexandra Kaschuta

What is psychosomatic medicine?

Friday, June 5th, 2015

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Psychosomatic medicine focuses on the interactions between mind and body and the powerful ways in which emotional, mental, social and spiritual factors can directly affect health.

Psychosomatic medicine focuses on the study and treatment of those emotional disturbances that are manifested as physical disorders. The term psychosomatic emphasizes essential unity of the psyche and the soma, a combination rooted in ancient Greek medicine. Common disorders caused at least partly by psychological factors include childhood asthma, certain gastrointestinal problems, hypertension, endocrine disturbances, diabetes, and possibly even heart disease.

Psychosomatic medicine deals with:

  • Clinical situations where mental processes act as a major factor affecting medical outcomes.
  • illnesses due to the interaction of the mind and the body
  • physical diseases which have a mental component derived from the stresses and strains of everyday living ex. lower back pain, high blood pressure
  • the influence that the mind has over physical processes
  • disabilities that are based on intellectual infirmities, rather than actual injuries or physical limitations, (somatoform disorders)
  • physical illness with their biopsychosocial aspects e.g. cancer diseases
  • physiological and functional disorders as response to psychological or physical trauma e.g. posttraumatic stress disorder and adjustment disorders
  • Conversion disorders physical symptoms , which go back to unconscious conflicts
  • Hypochondria
  • disturbed health behavior and its consequences (e.g. smoking)
  • mental disorders associated with physical discomfort: depression, anxiety disorders
  • mental illness, which have physiological effects : eating disorders, personality disorders

Psychosomatic medicine treatments are necessary in 3 different situations:

  1. The patients who have both a mental (psychiatric) illness and a medical illness, and these illnesses complicate the symptoms and management of each other
  2. The patients who have a psychiatric problem that is a direct result of a medical illness or its treatment, such as having depression due to cancer and its treatment.
  3. Somatoform disorders. Somatoform disorders are psychiatric disorders that are displayed through physical problems. In other words, the physical symptoms people experience are related to psychological factors rather than a medical cause.

Some examples:

  • Conversion disorder
  • Somatization disorder
  • Hypochondriasis
  • Body dysmorphic disorder
  • Pain disorder

Treatment types

  • psychotherapeutic conversation
  • dynamical psychotherapy
  • psychoanalyze
  • analytical group therapy
  • family therapy
  • suggestive therapy
  • hypnosis
  • body centered therapy
  • self-help groups

 

Advantages of residency training in psychosomatic medicine

Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy is an exciting and new growing medical specialty with a fast and constant evolution. It offers a new point of view regarding the correlation between physical and (somatic) illness and psychiatric factors that create somatic illnesses without physical substance. An interesting aspect is the fact that a psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy practitioner has the opportunity to conduct psychiatric evaluations and treatments for mentally healthy individuals without having to interact with common psychiatric patients.

In Germany psychosomatic primary care is compulsory part of training in all specialties. All practicing physicians need to complete an 80-hour course of basic psychosomatic care (psychosocial diagnostic interview, psychotherapeutic interventions, and relaxation techniques). The most common training method in psychosomatic medicine is based on the Balint groups method, in which a group of doctors, therapists and Psychologists consult with each other regarding the treatments of the patients and the treatment relationships.

The residency training lasts 5 years and the required rotations are the following:

  • 1 year psychiatry and psychotherapy (6 months can be spent in the department of child and adolescent psychiatry)
  • 1 year Internal medicine
  • 3 years in psychosomatics

If you start a residency in psychosomatic medicine and want to change your specialty, you can get some part of your residency training in psychosomatic medicine recognized in the following specialties:

  • Anesthesiology – 12 Months
  • Surgery – 6 Months
  • Gynecology – 6 Months (training in psychosomatics is mandatory)
  • Human genetics – 12 Months
  • Internal medicine and general medicine – 12 Months (training in psychosomatics is mandatory)
  • Pediatrics and adolescent medicine – 6 Months
  • Child and adolescent psychiatry and psychotherapy – 12 Months
  • Neurology – 12 Months
  • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Psychiatry -12 Months
  • Pathology – 12 Months
  • Pharmacology – 12 Months
  • Radiology – 12 Months

Supra specialties of psychosomatic medicine are:

  • Psychoanalysis
  • Psychotherapy
  • Rehabilitations medicine
  • Acupuncture
  • Allergology
  • Occupational medicine
  • Geriatrics
  • Homeopathy

 

Goodbye Headaches! Hello technology!

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

Something as simple as a common headache can ruin the daily rutine of every person no matter what.

But what would you do if you would commonly have migranes twice or three times per week? 

Think about it… How would you be able to function like a normal human being? 

For Gabriella Iaocovetti, severe headaches three or four times a week can bring her business and family life to a halt.

“No light. No noise. I try to put my head under the covers,” she says.

Like many migraine suffers, Iaocovetti also gets nauseous, which makes taking pills a problem.

“Patients will tell you, ‘Food hangs in my stomach. I’m sick to my stomach,'” says Dr. Stephen Silberstein at Jefferson University Hospital.

Even when Iaocovetti can swallow a pill, she says it takes several doses to find relief. Then, her doctor told her about an alternative now being tested. It is called the Zelrix Patch. It uses Sumatriptan, one of the most common migraine medications.

Since the drug is not normally absorbed through the skin, researchers added a tiny chip which generates a micro-current of electricity, to push it into the pores. It is about the same strength as the chips that power a musical greeting card.

Jane Hollingsworth heads up Nupath, the company that makes the chips.

“There’s a little button that you push and that starts it,” she explains. “A little red light tells you if it’s working or not, so you can see it.”

She says the patch delivers a controlled amount of medication for four hours then shuts off. She says so far, there have been no significant side effects in the clinical trials. Iaocovetti enrolled in the double blind study and while there is no way to know if she received the real patch, she believes her symptoms are already better.

The results of phase three clinical trials showed the patch was effective in treating migraines. 

 

Would you choose this alternative over a common Aspirine?

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern: A German state with a lot to offer!

Sunday, July 13th, 2014

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern  is a federal state in northern Germany. The capital city is Schwerin. The state was formed through the merger of the historic regions of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern after World War II, dissolved in 1952 and recreated prior to the

German reunification in 1990. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is the sixth largest German state by territory, and the least densely populated one. The coastline of the Baltic Sea, including islands such as Rügen and Usedom, as well as the Mecklenburg Lake District are characterized by many holiday resorts and pristine nature, making Mecklenburg-Vorpommern one of Germany’s leading tourist destinations.

   
Rügen
   
Usedom
Three of Germany’s fourteen national parks are in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, in addition to several hundred nature conservation areas.
Major cities in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern include Rostock, Schwerin, Neubrandenburg, Stralsund, Greifswald and Wismar. The University of Rostock and the University of Greifswald are among the oldest in Europe.
  
Schwerin

Culture
Over the centuries, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have developed and maintained strong regional cultures. It can generally be described as North German and has similar linguistic and historic characteristics to other north German states, such as Schleswig-Holstein.
Architecture
The cities are characterized by a certain “Hanseatic” style also found in other parts of northern Germany as well as in countries bordering the Baltic Sea. A common feature of many towns in Mecklenburg and Vorpommern are Gothic red brick churches dating back to the middle Ages. The old towns are usually built around one or several market places with a church or town hall. Often towns were founded at the Baltic Sea, one of the many lakes or a river for logistical and trade motives.
Greifswald

Museums, art and theaters:
The largest publicly-funded theaters in the state are the Mecklenburg State Theatre, the Rostock People’s Theatre, the Theatre of West Pomerania, with venues in Greifswald, Stralsund and Putbus, and the Mecklenburg State Theatre at Neusterlitz with venues in Neubrandenburg and Neusterlitz.
Since 1993, the Störtebeker Festival has taken place in Ralswiek on the island of Rügen. It is Germany’s most successful open-air theatre.
  
Störtebeker Festival
Notable museums include, for example, the Schwerin State Museum and the Pomeranian State Museum at Greifswald. The German Maritime Museum with its Ozeaneum in Stralsund is the most popular museum in northern Germany.
 
Ozeaneum in Stralsund
Furthermore, the German Amber Museum in Ribnitz-Damagarten, Rostock’s Abbey of the Holy Cross and Rostock Art Gallery are of national importance.
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is home to many cultural events throughout the year. During summer, many open air concerts and operas are open to visitors. The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival (Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) attracts a sizeable audience by performing classical concerts in parks, churches and castles.
  
The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival
Caspar David Friedrich, a famous romanticist painter born in Greifswald, immortalized parts of the state in several of his paintings.
  
Caspar David Friedrich- Greifswald
Food and drinks
Like most German regions, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have their own traditional dishes, often including fish, beef and pork. Rostock has its own type of bratwurst called Rostocker Bratwurst. An unusual food from Western Pomerania is Tollatsch. Rote Grütze is a popular dessert. The largest brewery produces Lübzer Pils.
  
Tollatsch, Rote Grütze , Lübzer Pils

Economy
In Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, approximately 732,200 people were gainfully employed in 2008 with 657,100 of them were withe and blue collar workers. About 4,200 new jobs were created in 2007. Employees worked an average of 1,455 hours a year. The number of self-employed did not change in 2008. Three out of every four of all people in work are employed in the service sector.
The biggest businesses in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern are the ferry operator Scandlines AG, the NETTO supermarket chain, the shipbuilders Aker MTW Werft, Volkswerft Stralsund GmbH and Aker Warnow Werft GmbH, the Energiewerke Nord GmbH and the shipping company F. Laeisz GmbH.

Tourism
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is among the top three destinations for inner-German tourism. The main tourist regions are:
  • Islands: Rügen and Usedom
  • Peninsula: Fischland-Darß-Zingst
  • Seaside towns: Heiligendamm, Graal-Müritz or Kühlungsborn
  • Cities: Stralsund and Wismar, both listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Rostock or Greifswald which have a large cultural heritage.
As a relic of the past, nearly 2,000 castles, palaces and manor houses exist in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, many of which function as venues for public events like concerts and festivals.
 
  
Notable people:
  • arts and film: Ernst Barlach, Friedrich von Flotow, Caspar David Friedrich, Marianne Hoppe, Till Lindemann, Philipp Otto Runge
  • business: Ernst Heinkel, Carl Heinrich von Siemens, Georg Wertheim
  • literature: Ernst Moritz Arndt, John Brinckman, Hans Fallada, Walter Kempowski, Fritz Reuter, Rudolf Tarnow, Ehm Welk
  • politics: Ernst Moritz Arndt, Dietmar Bartsch, Egon Krenz, Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, Harald Ringstorff, Angela Merkel, Joachim Gauck
  • science: Theodor Billroth, Friedrich Chrysander, Walther Flemming, Gottlob Frege, Otto Lilienthal, Gustav Mie, Ferdinand von Mueller, Paul Pogge, Heinrich Schliemann, Johannes Stark
  • sports: Tim Borowski, Andreas Dittmer, Thomas Doll, Marita Koch, Toni Kroos, Jan Ullrich, Jens Voigt, Sebastian Sylvester
If our article peaked your interest about this lovely German state, why don’t you check out our job-offers here at: www.MeJobs.eu and you’ll be one step closer to working as a doctor in Germany!

EGV Recruiting – Interview in the making

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Today is a day for answering questions. Today we opened our doors to the news crew from DIGI 24 Romania to answer key questions healthcare recruitment. 

The interview will shed light on subjects such as:

  • current healthcare recruitment trends for doctors and nurse abroad
  • the recruiting process in depth, from applying to starting the job abroad
  • Opportunities that foreign countries have to offer to medical professionals

The interview will soon be live on the news! Stay tuned for the actual interview in a couple of days!

Thank you!

Germany – Small Cities with a lot to offer!

Friday, May 30th, 2014

As a healthcare recruiting firm, we often come in contact with young candidates willing to relocate in Germany but mostly target large cities such as Munich, Berlin, Cologne, Stuttgart, etc. and refuse to even think about settling in a smaller city. 

Coming from eastern Europe, it is understandable that some people think that smaller towns = no opportunities and no modern commodities because in some countries this is a reality. In Germany on the other hand, smaller cities have a lot to offer and offer even more than one might expect!

If you drive through Germany and explore its cities and towns, you will experience that many cities are scattered throughout the country. There are however large German cities like Berlin, Hamburg, Munich and Cologne, as well as a lot of towns and villages.

Germany has about 82 million inhabitants. In the largest city, Berlin, live however only about 3.4 million inhabitants. In other words, the German way of life is a bit different to some other countries on earth where most people live concentrated in huge cities.

There are countries in which it seems as if humans would almost flee into the large cities. Germans dare to live comfortable and calm. There is sufficient stress during the day so it’s good to relax in the evening, in a calm environment.

Germany is remarkable for its attractive smaller towns and cities, scattered like gemstones around the country. In these historic hamlets, many of them located less than an hour’s train ride from a major metropolis, you ‘ll find a very different Germany, brimming with the flavors of the past

  • An easy daytrip from Hamburg, lovely Lübeck epitomizes the maritime culture and redbrick architecture of northern Germany. So many architectural gems are located here that the entire Old Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site – a place judged to be of exceptional cultural value.
  • Weimar, in eastern Germany, was a cradle of the German Enlightenment of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This small unspoiled town was home to Goethe and Schiller, among others, and provides a glimpse into 18th-century German life and culture.
  • Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a major highlight among the Romantic Road, it is a walled medieval city loaded with picturesque charm. You can walk along the old city walls of this perfectly preserved gem and stroll down streets that haven’t changed much in hundreds of years.
  • A stop on the Romantic Road or an easy daytrip from Munch,Augsburg is full of historic panache and architectural surprises, including Renaissance-era palaces and the oldest almshouse in Germany.
  • Located in the Bavarian Alps near Neuschwanstein Castle, Füssen invites you to stroll along its cobblestone streets past stone houses and a rushing mountain river.
  • One of the most sophisticated spa towns in Europe, Baden-Badenoffers an extraordinary range of spa treatments during the day and elegant gaming rooms at night.
  • Heidelberg, an old university town on the Neckar River, enchants visitors with its romantic setting, historic streets, and enormous castle.
  • Quedlinburg: Spared in part from the ravages of World War II, this town in the Harz mountains still evokes the Middle Ages with its, 1600 half-timbered buildings, more than any other town in the country. Named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Quedlingburg is a gem of yesterday and was an imperial residence for 2 centuries.
  • Meissen, situated 25km north of Dresden, this is a romantic little town built along the banks of the River Elbe. It’s celebrated for its porcelain, which carries a trademark of two crossed blue swords and is valued by collectors the world over. Even without its porcelain factory, the town merits a visit for its quiet charm, its old buildings, and its 15th-century castle.
  • Dinkelsblüh, situated along the Romantic Road, it is not as grand as the more celebrated Rothenburg, it has fewer tourists and therefore retains more old-time charm.
  • Mittenwald, has long been celebrated as the most beautiful in the Bavarian Alps, with magnificently decorated houses, painted facedes and ornately carved gables. In the mid-17th century, it was known as “the Village of a Thousand Violins” because of the stringed instruments made here.
  • Lindau, dates back to the 9th century, this former free imperial town of the Holy Roman Empire is like a fantasy of what a charming Bavarian lakeside village should look like. This garden city under landmark protection is enveloped by aquamarine waters, and one part of it is known as the Gardenstadt because of its luxuriant flowers and shrubs.
  • Rüdesheim, is the most popular wine town in the Rhine Valley, being set along the edge ot he mighty river. Rüdesheim is known for its half-timbered buildings and its Drosselgasse, a narrow cobblestone lane stretching for 180m and lined with wine taverns and cozy restaurants.
  • Cochem, is an idyllic medieval riverside town situated in the wine country on the banks of the Mosel river. It is famous for its towering castle, dating from 1027. On the left bank of the Mosel, Cochem lies in a picture-postcard setting of vineyards. Little inns serving a regional cuisine along with plenty of Mosel wine make Cochem a highly desirable overnight stop and a nice alternative to the more commercial centers found along the nearby Rhine.

Adding my personal opinion to this article I have to state that the charm, history and romance of the smaller cities and towns in Germany have captured my heart and imagination.

If our article has sparked your interest you are more than welcome to apply for a job at info@MeJobs.eu

EGV Recruiting

 

Living in Abu Dhabi

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Due to the fact that we currently have new job vacancies for specialist doctors in the field of Cardiology, Gynecology, Nephrology, Anesthesiology, Pediatrics, Radiology and Emergency Medicine in the United Arab Emirates capital city Abu Dhabi, we consider useful to provide some information about living in the UAE. 

Abu Dhabi is a modern day miracle, and is considered Dubai’s less-brash sister city. Abu Dhabi now has its own skyline of architect-designed bridges and buildings, as well as a growing cluster of international museums and high-rise apartment blocks rising from the desert, making it an increasingly attractive place to live for both expats and Emirates.

What is it known for?

Abu Dhabi is a modern day miracle, and is considered Dubai’s less-brash sister city. Abu Dhabi now has its own skyline of architect-designed bridges and buildings, as well as a growing cluster of international museums and high-rise apartment blocks rising from the desert, making it an increasingly attractive place to live for both expats and Emirates.

What is it known for?

Located just 130km south from splashy Dubai, coastal Abu Dhabi has traditionally been known as the staid seat of the federal government, home to the ruling Abu Dhabi Emiri Family. The emirate owns 95% of the UAE’s oil production and 90% of the population is made up of expats. “Abu Dhabi provides a wealth of opportunity and allows people to live tax free,” said Lizzie Johnstone, a Brit who has lived with her family in Abu Dhabi for five years. “The expat and local community are welcoming, the schools are good and at the weekend you can go to the beach.”

Abu Dhabi is the largest of the UAE’s seven constituent emirates, and the city center is on Abu Dhabi island, connected to the mainland by three bridges and surrounded by a number of smaller islands, many of which are being developed by luxury resorts, shopping malls and real estate companies. Over the last decade the city has concentrated on developing its tourism, education, financial and cultural sectors to diversify its economy, which until recently relied almost exclusively on oil production. On Saadiyat Island (less than a kilometre off the shore of Abu Dhabi’s city centre), alongside luxury developments and golf courses, architect Jean Nouvel’s floating Louvre Abu Dhabi will open in December 2015, part of a cultural district that will also include the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (designed by Frank Gehry, due to open 2016) and the Zayed National Museum (designed by Foster + Partners, possibly opening 2017). A second campus for New York University Abu Dhabi is being planned for the island’s Marina district. Suburbs like the futuristic Masdar City are also part of the emirate’s master plan.

While the snazzy luxury resorts bring a bit of Dubai-like glitz, the city is also making efforts to preserve its natural resources, such as mangroves and turtle nesting spots along the turquoise waters. “If you are prepared to work hard, embrace the desert and respect the culture, you will have a very nice life,” Johnstone said.

Where do you want to live?

The Corniche on Abu Dhabi island stretches along the waterfront and is home to many mixed-use developments, hotels and malls, making it a very desirable place to live. Also sought-after are the modern luxury developments found on other islands such as Al Reem, or on the mainland in suburbs such as Khalifa City along the Abu Dhabi-Dubai Road. “People are spread out all over, but it will never take you more than half an hour ­– traffic permitting – to get anywhere,” Johnstone said.

Saadiyat Island is currently being developed with villas and high-end apartment blocks, and will be home to about 160,000 residents. Another popular island located close to the city centre, Al Reem, has experienced a few setbacks. “The master planning on Al Reem didn’t quite take off, so some of the projects have stalled,” said William Neill, director and head of Cluttons Abu Dhabi real estate and property consultant agency. Al Raha Beach, an area of Khalifa City, has a range of medium to high-end apartments, plus access to private beaches. North of the Abu Dhabi International Airport, along the E11 motorway to Dubai, the Al Reef development has villas that are popular with families.

Side trips

Dubai is about a 90-minute drive north, depending on traffic, and people go back and forth frequently; a passenger rail link between the two cities is in the planning stages, with the first expected service in 2018. Oman’s Musandam Peninsula is a popular weekend destination for diving and dolphin watching, and the northern emirate Fujairah is popular for trekking through the wadis (valleys) and hills. Muscat, the capital of Oman, is around 435km to the east, a four-hour drive or a short flight away.

Abu Dhabi International Airport has flights to many European and Asian destinations. Mumbai is about a three-hour flight, while the Maldives are just more than four hours away. Paris and London are each about a six or seven hour flight.

Practical information

Prices in Abu Dhabi used to be much higher than Dubai, so people would often live in Dubai and commute to Abu Dhabi. But post-recession, the scenario has flipped. “In addition, the government put in place a rule that if you work for a government agency or ministry, you have to live in Abu Dhabi and that helped feed demand,” Neill said. Now prices in the older buildings on Abu Dhabi Island are falling as people leave for newer communities. In modern developments and luxury buildings, there is a high demand in both rentals and sales. “Sale value tends to be going up because there is a low supply on the market,” Neill explained.

Most expats rent while living in Abu Dhabi. A two-bedroom flat in a high end building on the Corniche, Saadiyat Island or in Al Raha Beach rents for between 140,000 to 200,000 dirhams a year (it is typical for rents to be paid yearly in Abu Dhabi). On Al Reem, a similar property rents for 110,000 to 130,000 dirhams a year. In these prime areas, apartments currently cost 14,200 dirhams per square meters.

If you are interested in applying for a position in Abu Dhabi via EGV Recruiting, please contact us at:

http://www.mejobs.eu/en/contact.html

 

 

Source of the article here:

http://www.bbc.com/travel/feature/20131203-living-in-abu-dhabi/1

Denmark’s idyllic countryside

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Well-known for its cosmopolitan capital, cutting edge contemporary design and the timeless fairytales of Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark’s stunning coastlines and rolling countryside must be equally revered.

With mile upon mile of pristine coastline complemented by an unspoiled interior of forests, heaths and rolling farmland, the Danes love nothing more than getting out into the heart of their beautiful countryside. Visitors can also easily follow suit by making a leisurely exploration along one of the many designated, long-distance touring trails – ideal for exploring on foot, by bike or on an unhurried drive along picturesque country lanes.

Spoiled for choice when it comes to touring itineraries, visitors looking to travel under their own steam, for example, can walk or cycle sections of the Hærvej, or ‘Army Way’, which traces what was for centuries the main transportation route through the Jutland peninsular. Linking a whole network of paths, it forms a 250km trail along the backbone of the country, from the town of Viborg in north-central Jutland all the way south to the German border and beyond. With well-maintained walking and cycling trails established along this historic route, it follows a ridge that affords some of the most spectacular views in Denmark.

Dotted with interesting sights – including breathtaking natural scenery, historic fortifications, ancient burial mounds and plenty of Viking history – visitors can put their best foot forward discovering these at their own pace. Marking a start to the Hærvej, the imposing Viborg Cathedral, one of the largest granite churches in northern Europe whose two towers dominate the skyline, is a definite highlight. From here, the path continues south across the wild, open heaths of Kongenshus Hede and on through the outstanding natural beauty of Egtved, known for its windmills, watermills and Bronze Age relics from the grave of the Egtved Girl – which include some incredibly well-preserved burial objects dating from around 1370BC. Another unmissable historic attraction is Jelling, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s home to a huge, ship-shaped stone circle that was created in the 10th Century by the Viking Kings Gorm the Old and Harold Bluetooth. More recent history can be found at the Frøslev Camp Museum, a well-preserved World War II prison camp that once interred political prisoners and members of the Danish Resistance. There are also a good number of interesting detours to be made from the Hærvej, such as a visit to the sources of Denmark’s longest (the GudenÃ¥) and its largest (SkjernÃ¥) rivers, which rise just a few hundred metres apart but then flow in opposite directions towards the east and west coasts respectively, creating their own attractions.

Runic stones in Jelling Denmark

Visitors preferring a less energetic means of travel can instead opt for one of the driving tours such as the Margueritruten, a scenic route that passes through spectacular countryside on its way past more than 200 of Denmark’s most popular attractions. Marked by characteristic marguerite (daisy) road-signs, this winding 3,600km route takes in the cities of Copenhagen, Odense and Aalborg as it wends its way through Zealand, Funen and on through central and northern Jutland, exploring some of the country’s most remote corners. Cleverly following an extremely well-planned network of roads, the trail ensures drivers never see the same view twice. Although designated as a driving route, following such quiet roads makes it equally well suited to touring by bike.

The Marguerite Route also takes full advantage of Denmark’s stunning coastline passing along the west coast and providing visitors with an opportunity to discover the Wadden Sea, one of Denmark’s most ecologically important areas. Depending on the time of year, visitors to this vast intertidal area can encounter some incredible wildlife spectacles. In the spring and autumn, the mudflats provide an important stopover site over ten million migrating shorebirds, which pause on the food-rich alluvium to refuel before continuing their epic journeys. The transitional months are also the time to witness the phenomenon of the Black Sun, when huge flocks of starlings swirl across the dusk sky with their amazing aerobatic displays presenting a truly mesmerising sight. In summer, seal safaris operate from Esbjerg Harbour, with sightings of spotted seals being virtually guaranteed. Then from October to April, guided walks across the tidal flats give visitors the chance to forage for fresh oysters, which can be harvested in large numbers all across the area.

Another interesting spot along the West Jutland coast is Ringkøbing Fjord, an area of outstanding natural beauty that’s known in particular for its watersports. Windsurfers are especially well catered for here, but there are also plenty of opportunities for other activities like canoeing, angling or simply taking a refreshing dip. Nearby Nymindegab Kro offers an interesting place to stay; this traditional Danish inn is perched high on the dunes overlooking the North Sea and is the perfect place for exploring the surrounds or tucking into delicious local dishes. Further north, the route passes through Thy National Park, allowing visitors a chance to discover nature in the raw in this extensive area of dunes, forests and heaths including the wetland reserve of Vejlerne – the largest bird sanctuary in northern Europe and home to all kinds of rare and unusual flora and fauna.

Away from the coast, other highlights along the Marguerite Route include the fairytale forest of Rold Skov. At 80 km², this is Denmark’s largest forest and home to ancient trees, crystal-clear lakes and rare wild orchids. More natural beauty can be found at Rebild Bakker, a famously picturesque area of woods, gorges and valleys,  and Mols Bjerge National Park, which occupies an area of rolling hills and wildflower-rich meadows on the Djursland peninsula. Closer to Aalborg, Denmark’s third largest city, lies Lindholm Høje, home to Scandinavia’s largest Viking burial ground with more than 700 well-preserved graves. Also of historical interest is Koldinghus Castle, Jutland’s oldest royal castle and home to an extensive art collection. Another interesting place to visit is the pretty town of Vejle, which is so well-loved by the Danes that it’s been labelled ‘Denmark’s cosiest town’. Just outside Vejle lies the recently-created Kongens Kær wetland park, complete with nature trails and picnic areas – another perfect place for visitors to pause on their journey and reflect on the pleasures of day touring, Danish-style.

Whether walking, riding or driving, Denmark’s numerous touring routes and trails offer the perfect path to a relaxing holiday.

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Source of the article here: http://www.visitdenmark.co.uk/

Hermann Gröhe, Germany’s Minister of Health, – “No other country offers faster medical care from qualified specialist doctors than Germany.”

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

Hermann Gröhe, the German Health minister, announces publicly his wish to enforce a larger medical coverage of Germany’s rural areas.

“Young doctors should commit themselves to take over a practice in rural areas. Of course, such actions should also be stimulated with some advantages such as better access to further and constant training or other types of incentives.”

Such advantages should also be granted to those who undertake a voluntary social year, as for example in the emergency services. “In some states and in some universities, such arrangements were already practiced successfully” stated the Minister of health.

Gröhe also stated that the waiting time for a medical appointment for any ensured patient should be shortend.

For the ministers proposal of shorter  waiting times for medical appointments with specialists, the German Medical Association has proposed the introduction of an “Urgent Transfer Measure” so that the General Practitioners can quickly convey their insured patients to a specialist doctor.

As a closing statement Gröhe says that the health system in Germany should not be criticized:

“If you are really seriously ill, you will receive professional medical care in Germany. No other country offers faster medical care from qualified specialist doctors than Germany.”

 

Source of the article here

 

Health and ageing

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Hamburg: Since the 1960s, the life expectancy in most European countries has risen with 11 years. Still, most European citizens (60%) over 65 have at least 3 chronic diseases.

Thus since 2007, the Ministry of Education and Research emphasizes on the importance of a healthy ageing process.

“The research conducted aims to educate and help with the early recognition of potential threats to the state of health of an individual. Prevention should be a priority.” Stated Johanna Wanka, the Minister of Education and Research.

This approach aims to have the individual in the center of attention and should be aiming to provide a longer disease-free life and not a longer life with disease.